Eideard

British and Japanese scientists win Nobel for stem cell research

with 4 comments

Scientists from Britain and Japan shared a Nobel Prize today for the discovery that adult cells can be transformed back into embryo-like stem cells that may one day regrow tissue in damaged brains, hearts or other organs.

John Gurdon, 79, of the Gurdon Institute in Cambridge, Britain and Shinya Yamanaka, 50, of Kyoto University in Japan, discovered ways to create tissue that would act like embryonic cells, without the need to harvest embryos.

They share the $1.2 million Nobel Prize for Medicine, for work Gurdon began 50 years ago and Yamanaka capped with a 2006 experiment that transformed the field of “regenerative medicine” – the field of curing disease by regrowing healthy tissue.

“These groundbreaking discoveries have completely changed our view of the development and specialization of cells,” the Nobel Assembly at Stockholm’s Karolinska Institute said.

All of the body’s tissue starts as stem cells, before developing into skin, blood, nerves, muscle and bone. The big hope for stem cells is that they can be used to replace damaged tissue in everything from spinal cord injuries to Parkinson’s disease.

Scientists once thought it was impossible to turn adult tissue back into stem cells, which meant that new stem cells could only be created by harvesting embryos – a practice that raised ethical qualms in some countries and also means that implanted cells might be rejected by the body.

A significant reason why the United States wasn’t competitive in this research for years. Not because of legitimate ethical concerns – automatic in this realm. No – because of anti-science interference, handicaps introduced by the Bush Administration and the nutballs brought into political power by the Party-formerly-known-as-Republican.

My contempt never recedes for ideologues, pundits and prophets who assign values of good or bad to knowledge. They would thwart any research topic by assigning a value to study based on what they think may result.

In 1958, Gurdon was the first scientist to clone an animal, producing a healthy tadpole from the egg of a frog with DNA from another tadpole’s intestinal cell. That showed developed cells still carry the information needed to make every cell in the body, decades before other scientists made headlines around the world by cloning the first mammal, Dolly the sheep.

More than 40 years later, Yamanaka produced mouse stem cells from adult mouse skin cells, by inserting a few genes. His breakthrough effectively showed that the development that takes place in adult tissue could be reversed, turning adult cells back into cells that behave like embryos. The new stem cells are known as “induced pluripotency stem cells“, or iPS cells…

“We would like to be able to find a way of obtaining spare heart or brain cells from skin or blood cells. The important point is that the replacement cells need to be from the same individual, to avoid problems of rejection and hence of the need for immunosuppression…”

Thomas Perlmann, Nobel Committee member and professor of Molecular Development Biology at the Karolinska Institute said: “Thanks to these two scientists, we know now that development is not strictly a one-way street.”

The techniques are already being used to grow specialized cells in laboratories to study disease, the chairman of the awards committee, Urban Lendahl, told Reuters.

“You can’t take out a large part of the heart or the brain or so to study this, but now you can take a cell from for example the skin of the patient, reprogram it, return it to a pluripotent state, and then grow it in a laboratory,” he said.

“The second thing is for further ahead. If you can grow different cell types from a cell from a human, you might – in theory for now but in future hopefully – be able to return cells where cells have been lost.”

Then, there is Gurdon’s daily reflection on his early education. On the wall of his office, he keeps a note sent to his mom by a teacher…”I believe he has ideas about becoming a scientist… This is quite ridiculous,” his teacher wrote. “It would be a sheer waste of time, both on his part and of those who have to teach him.” The young John “will not listen, but will insist on doing his work in his own way.”

Ah, the wonders of an education so confident of rote oversight.

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Written by Ed Campbell

October 8, 2012 at 10:00 am

4 Responses

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  1. Gurdon was on the radio this evening he was such a cool dude ‘What is your initial reaction to winning the Prize?’ asked the interviewer – ‘Well I haven’t had time to think about it’ he said ‘I’ve spent the whole day doing interviewsi. I liked that

    trixfred30

    October 8, 2012 at 2:05 pm

    • Understated, even subtle, humor is nonexistent this side of the pond.

      eideard

      October 8, 2012 at 2:08 pm

      • You have Bill Murray. That chap is gold in my book (especially in Groundhog Day)

        trixfred30

        October 8, 2012 at 2:15 pm

  2. [...] Image: Eideard Filed Under: Science Tagged With: adult DNA, Britain, cloning the first mammal, create tissue, cure disease, dna, Dolly the sheep, ethical objections, first scientist to clone an animal, growing healthy tissue, Gurdon Institute in Cambridge, induced pluripotency stem cells, iPS cells, japan, Japan’s nuclear industry, John Gurdon, Kyoto University, mouse stem cells, Nobel Prize for Medicine, Parkinson's disease, regenerative medicine, replace damaged tissue, research bans, Shinya Yamanaka, spinal cord injuries, tadpole, UK And Japan Scientists Win Nobel For Adult Stem Cell Breakthroughs [...]


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