Eideard

Texas environmental style: lots of oil, no water

with 2 comments

“The day that we ran out of water I turned on my faucet and nothing was there and at that moment I knew the whole of Barnhart was down the tubes,” Beverly McGuire said, blinking back tears. “I went: ‘dear God help us. That was the first thought that came to mind.”

Across the south-west, residents of small communities like Barnhart are confronting the reality that something as basic as running water, as unthinking as turning on a tap, can no longer be taken for granted.

Three years of drought, decades of overuse and now the oil industry’s outsize demands on water for fracking are running down reservoirs and underground aquifers. And climate change is making things worse.

In Texas alone, about 30 communities could run out of water by the end of the year, according to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

Nearly 15 million people are living under some form of water rationing, barred from freely sprinkling their lawns or refilling their swimming pools. In Barnhart’s case, the well appears to have run dry because the water was being extracted for shale gas fracking…

Katharine Hayhoe, a climate scientist at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, argues fracking is not the only reason Texas is going dry – and nor is the drought. The latest shocks to the water system come after decades of overuse by ranchers, cotton farmers, and fast-growing thirsty cities.

“We have large urban centres sucking water out of west Texas to put on their lands. We have a huge agricultural community, and now we have fracking which is also using water,” she said. And then there is climate change.

West Texas has a long history of recurring drought, but under climate change, the south-west has been experiencing record-breaking heatwaves, further drying out the soil and speeding the evaporation of water in lakes and reservoirs. Underground aquifers failed to regenerate. “What happens is that climate change comes on top and in many cases it can be the final straw that breaks the camel’s back, but the camel is already overloaded,” said Hayhoe.

RTFA for examples of the greed and ignorance you would expect to be leading the way to destruction of historic ways of life in Texas. Most of that current is well-established and already self-destructive. Time is simply catching up with extractive industries – and that includes most Texas-style ranching.

Politicians elected to state and federal office in Texas use every traditional populist lie to gain and maintain power for whichever club of profiteers is paying their way. Generally the Oil Patch Boys. Everything from straight-up bible-thumping to hating furriners – which extends from hating folks across landed borders to folks on the other side of the state. Fear and hatred is all you really need to maintain yourself on the conservative ledger.

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Written by Ed Campbell

August 11, 2013 at 2:00 pm

2 Responses

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  1. Reblogged this on politicaltrashtalk.

    politicaltrashtalk

    August 11, 2013 at 3:39 pm

  2. American industry never pays for the FREE use of natural resources. Charge them more for a gallon of water than for a gallon of crude oil on the open market and see how long they stay.

    MichaelB.

    August 12, 2013 at 6:33 am


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