Category: Photography

Mid-winter on the New England coast — cold enough to freeze waves

freezing wave
Click to enlargeCredit Jonathan Nimerfroh

How cold has it been on Nantucket? Chilly enough to freeze waves.

Last Friday, Jonathan Nimerfroh, a photographer, arrived on the beach and saw an unusual sight: slow-moving waves of slush…

Normally, water freezes at 32 degrees Fahrenheit. But salt in the ocean lowers the freezing temperature — basically by getting in the way of the water molecules — to about 28.4 degrees.

The movement of the waves seems to have broken up ice crystals before they could grow into a sheet covering that shallow stretch of the Atlantic Ocean. The result was an ocean with the consistency of a 7-Eleven Slurpee…

Mr. Nimerfroh returned to the beach on Saturday, which was even colder by a few degrees. But by then, the water had frozen into an ice sheet. “Nothing was moving,” he said. “There were no waves anymore.”

I’ve seen this a few times – growing up on the New England coast. Made me feel even colder. :)

30 years of Reuters Pictures: Part three

Wander through this article and enjoy stunning photography, meaningful in so many ways. Personal, political, history recorded – sometimes just before it is forgotten. Check out the two preceding parts, explore the Reuters’ slideshows.

Here are a couple of samples:


Click to enlarge

The Northern Lights are seen above the ash plume of Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull volcano…Reuters photographer Lucas Jackson.
 


Click to enlarge

Staff members stand in a meeting room at Lehman Brothers offices in London. It is the beginning of the global financial crisis…Reuters photographer Kevin Coombs.

A rapidly growing city of Paperholm(s) — by Om Malik

Tumblr is a wonderful place — you just don’t know what you are going to stumble into! A few weeks ago, I ended up on Paperholm, a website where Edinburgh-based architect/artist Charles Young has been sharing photos of miniature homes he has been creating out of paper. Since August 2014, he has shared multiple creations – each intricate, beautiful and nearly perfect. Obsessed with these paper homes, I cold emailed Young wondering what got him started. “The project started as a way of keeping myself making work,” he replied. “By having to produce something every day you’re forced to be creative and productive…”

What made him pick paper as a medium of creation? “The use of paper is really about its material properties,” Young replied in an email. “Using it as a construction material, at this scale, watercolour paper has a balance of delicacy and strength that make it ideal.” Like Young, I too am obsessed with paper — I prefer to write with fountain pens on good quality (Japanese) paper. That act allows me to slow down the brain, think, compose, rethink and ink what is on my mind.

Now for the important question — how long does he expect to be doing this? “Even at this stage I’m not sure how long I will continue with the project. I’d like to complete at least a year of daily models but Paperholm is really more about keeping inventive and developing my own technical skills.”

Charles, as a fan, let’s just say, I am happy for whatever you create. These paper homes are a delightful addition to my life!

I’ve been reading Om longer than I have been blogging. His insight into technology has expanded a dozen different ways; but, especially into style and fashion. In this instance, into the materials and methods used for expression.

During first cuppa in the morning – sometime between 4:30 and 5:15AM – I check my personal blog to make certain nothing screwed up down in Waco, Texas. That’s where the servers are hosting us. Then, I wander over to see what Om has on his mind. He’ll be up and running because we’re on the same servers. And he’s an early riser, too. :)

Always worthwhile.

Pic of the Day

Musa, a Kurdish marksman
Click to enlargeBulent Kilic

Musa, a 25-year-old Kurdish marksman, stands atop a building as he looks at the destroyed Syrian city of Kobani on Friday. Kurdish forces recaptured the town on the Turkish frontier on January 26, in a symbolic blow to the ISIS militants who have seized large swathes of territory in their onslaught across Syria and Iraq.

Hubble captures Jovian triple-moon conjunction


Click to enlarge

Firing off a string of snapshots like a sports photographer at a NASCAR race, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope captured a rare look at three of Jupiter’s largest moons parading across the banded face of the gas-giant planet: Europa, Callisto, and Io.

These so-called Galilean satellites (named after the 17th century scientist Galileo Galilei, who discovered them with a telescope) complete orbits around Jupiter ranging from 2 days to 17 days in duration. They can commonly be seen transiting the face of Jupiter and casting shadows onto its cloud tops. However, seeing three moons transiting the face of Jupiter at the same time is rare, occurring only once or twice a decade…

Missing from the sequence is the moon Ganymede, which was outside Hubble’s field of view and too far from Jupiter in angular separation to be considered part of the conjunction.

Way cool.

Women of National Geographic

leakeys-landscape_44349_600x450
Meave and Louise Leakey

We’re celebrating women in science and the major impacts they’re making in a variety of fields.

Meet some of the female scientists National Geographic has had the honor of supporting through the years. Hear from “Her Deepness,” Sylvia Earle, about the role of women in science—and find out who recently named her as a “Woman of the Year”.

Discover the incredible solar power breakthrough National Geographic Emerging Explorer Xiaoling Zheng is working on.

See how Big Cats Initiative Grantee Amy Dickman is transforming lives—human and feline—in Tanzania. Then learn why it’s crucial that more women get into science, and how we can help remove the barriers to their success.

Lots more at NatGeo. Click the link above and enjoy and learn.

Thanks, Ursarodinia

Underwater photographers caught in sperm whale Poopnado!

When Keri Wilk dived into clear waters off the island of Dominica, swimming through a massive whale poo was not in the plan. But it’s what happened.

“At first, it seemed like a regular bowel movement,” Keri explained…”But rather than continuing its dive down, it remained at the surface and continued to defecate for a startling length of time.

The “poonado” then spread through the water – ending up in Keri’s mouth – as the whale flapped its tail.

“Four of us looked at each other with confusion, then back at the whale, expecting that any second its call from nature would come to an end…

“Instead, the whale bobbed up and down, spun in circles and waved the poo in every direction for several minutes while we just sat back and watched.”

Keri said the poo ended up spreading about 30 metres around him and his three fellow divers.

“After a few waves of faeces were released and stirred vigorously by the whale, the water was like chocolate milk, I couldn’t see my hand when I held it in front of my face.

I had poop in my eyes, mouth, wetsuit, everywhere and I was soaked in it from head to toe. But, after leaving the cloud, it quickly washed away, and didn’t leave a smell on us.

“I did take an extra long shower once I returned to shore later that day, just in case.

Eeoough!

Thanks, Ursarodinia