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Posts Tagged ‘police

Woman abandoned by her lover after falling down a 15-foot well while having sex

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No – I don’t know if this is the actual well

Spanish police are hoping to speak to a man who allegedly left 21-year-old Edelia Aponte at the bottom of a well after she fell in while they were having sex.

Aponte got stuck in the water at the bottom of the 15-foot hole for about a half hour after failing to notice that the wood covering the well’s opening was loose.

Police found out about the young woman’s situation after they received an anonymous phone call alerting them about her whereabouts. It’s possible that the man, whom she had only just met that evening, placed the call.

If Ciudad Real police are able to track him down, the man could be charged with failing to aid someone in need of assistance.

Firefighters rescued Aponte from the well and she was taken to a hospital and treated for hypothermia.

“It could have ended in tragedy,” fire service spokesman Leni Portillo told El Crisol de Ciudad Real. “Luckily, she could swim and she wasn’t knocked out as she fell.”

The range of preparations requisite for modern impulsive sex never seems limited. I guess swimming lessons are now required.

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Written by Ed Campbell

April 4, 2014 at 2:00 am

Delhi Police don’t respond to complaint hotline for eight years — say they lost the password!

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Police in India have failed to act on hundreds of corruption complaints over an eight-year period because they did not know a computer password, it seems.

Delhi officers could not operate a portal holding more than 600 complaints – a lapse that has gone undetected since 2006, the Indian Express Newspaper said. The complaints came from India’s anti-corruption agency, called the Central Vigilance Commission.

But two senior police officers have now been trained in the system, and can access the 667 cases that have piled up since the portal launched. One officer told the paper the oversight was “a technical problem”, and complaints are now being addressed…

Despite the confusion, police in Delhi “remain committed to public grievances“, a senior officer told the Indian Express.

Um, OK.

Written by Ed Campbell

March 8, 2014 at 8:00 pm

What does growing pot in New Mexico have to do with the NSA?

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pot chopper

Fourteen marijuana plants and seven years later, a New Mexico high court has overturned a lower court opinion and ruled that a police helicopter search operation in rural Taos County was illegal and unconstitutional.

The subject of that search, who said he had the 14 plants for personal use to smoke to alleviate physical ailments, was elated when contacted on Friday.

“It has been a lesson in the slow progress of the legal system … I’m happy that justice was served,” said Norman Davis, now 78.

Davis’ home was one of several checked out during a 2006 operation dubbed “Operation Yerba Buena” – a joint State Police, National Guard, and state Game and Fish effort that was targeting marijuana plantations in the sparsely populated Carson area…

Davis had his privacy jarred when, on a summer day as he was sitting on his sofa and feeling a bit out of sorts, he “heard this helicopter overhead.

“It was loud. Very loud,” Davis said at the time. “And I looked out the window and see these guys hovering over me.” The drug raid by the New Mexico State Police, using National Guard helicopters, involved six or seven officers armed with semiautomatic weapons and at least five police vehicles…

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ed Campbell

January 21, 2014 at 2:00 pm

80 coppers and firemen charged in social security fraud

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Too depressed, too ill to work

Eighty retired New York City police officers and firefighters were charged on Tuesday in one of the largest Social Security disability frauds ever, a sprawling decades-long scheme in which false mental disability claims by as many as 1,000 people cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars, according to court papers.

Scores of those charged in the case essentially stole in plain sight, according to a 205-count indictment and a bail letter, collecting between $30,000 and $50,000 a year based on fabricated claims that they were completely incapacitated by serious psychiatric disorders. Many said that their actions in response to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks were responsible for their psychiatric conditions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety or depression.

But their Facebook pages and other websites, according to the court papers, tell a starkly different story.

The bail letter includes photographs culled from the Internet that show one riding a jet ski and others working at jobs ranging from helicopter pilot to martial arts instructor. One is shown fishing off the coast of Costa Rica and another sitting astride a motorcycle, while another appeared in a television news story selling cannoli at the Feast of San Gennaro on Mulberry Street in Manhattan.

Indeed, prosecutors charge that they were coached by the scheme’s organizers to appear disheveled and disoriented during interviews, in which doctors initially evaluated their disability applications before finding them to be mentally disabled and incapable of any work whatsoever.

Read ‘em and weep, folks. Weep for the legitimate needs of so many first responders dying of cancer because the city and state won’t admit to carcinogenic materials in building codes.

Save your anger for the scumbags who participated in the scam. Keep a cynical eye on the judicial processes convened to prosecute the ringleaders. These fine upstanding members of the NY legal community, independent experts who consult on compensating the injured and ill, folks chartered to represent the needs of working people. While stealing from the whole community.

Written by Ed Campbell

January 7, 2014 at 8:00 pm

Massachusetts coppers pay bitcoin ransom in malware scam

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Massachusetts police have admitted to paying a bitcoin ransom after being infected by the Cryptolocker ransomware.

The Cryptolocker malware infects a computer, normally via a legitimate-looking email that urges the reader to open an attachment often posing as a voicemail, fax, invoice or details of a suspicious transaction that is being queried.

Once the Windows computer is infected, the malware encrypts the user’s hard drive and then begins displaying a countdown timer, while demanding payment for the release of the data of 2 bitcoins – an almost untraceable, peer-to-peer digital online currency – which at current exchange rates equates to about…$1338.

“(The virus) is so complicated and successful that you have to buy these bitcoins, which we had never heard of,” Swansea Police Lt. Gregory Ryan talking to the Herald News. “It was an education for (those who) had to deal with it.”

Ryan insisted that the Massachusetts police systems were now clear of infection, and that essential operational computers were not affected, nor was there any data stolen…

If a computer becomes infected it should immediately be disconnected from any networks and a professional called in to clear the machine. However, the current state of encryption technology means that it is unlikely the encryption can be unscrambled, and therefore the hard drive will likely have to be erased and restored from a backup.

The rules and procedures needed for protection are the same as they ever were. Don’t open attachments within unexpected emails. Social engineering is what it’s all about folks. Showing up on your cyber-doorstep with a plausible tale that sounds interesting and especially profitable. So, emails imitate correspondence from your bank, your best friend – whose system is already compromised – your grocery store or Doctor Oz.

Verify and validate on your own separate from any links you can click on. Your world isn’t going to come to an early demise if you miss an “important” communique from Microsoft. Even if it is genuine, they’re probably just trying to sell you something.

The solution is always easier if you’re doing regular backups. You then can wipe your hard drive – or even buy a new one – and restore your backup from a verified safe source and date. I use Apple’s Time Machine to perform incremental backups on my desktop computer once an hour. I use SuperDuper once a week to backup the whole hard drive. Each of those are to separate standalone hard drives.

Written by Ed Campbell

November 24, 2013 at 11:00 am

Computer-generated image – Sweetie – catches online predators

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More than 100 Britons were among 1,000 men caught trying to pay a computer-generated child to perform sex acts online, after a Dutch children’s charity set up a fake profile.

Terre des Hommes carried out a 10-week sting near Amsterdam, posing on video chat rooms as “Sweetie”, a 10-year-old Filipina girl.

Some 20,000 men contacted her, with 1,000 found to have offered her money…The names of these men – including 110 Britons – were passed to police…

When I visited the charity’s operations room – in a warehouse on the outskirts of Amsterdam – I watched as a researcher logged on to a chat room as Sweetie – incredibly life-like but created by a computer.

Within seconds, like sharks, men were circling.

Of the 1,000 men who were willing to pay Sweetie to take off her clothes in front of a webcam, 254 were from the US, followed by 110 from the UK and 103 from India…

The charity has now handed over its findings to police and has said it will provide authorities with the technology it has developed.

But European policing agency Europol has expressed reservations about the findings…And Andy Baker, of the UK’s National Crime Agency, also said that “tackling child sex abusers is best left to specialist law enforcement agencies”.

But he praised the campaign, saying it had “widened awareness of a global child sex abuse threat”…

Sweetie will not be used again. She has done her job – showing the predators that they can easily become prey.

If they’re keeping the program going, they should invest in better software. Sweetie ain’t near the sort of realism approached in computer-generated images for lots of movies.

OTOH, maybe this shows how strung out and weird the guys are who attempted to liason with Sweetie.

Written by Ed Campbell

November 6, 2013 at 8:00 am

Batman called upon to save Marseille from crime

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MARSEILLE-BATMAN

Residents in Marseille, France have officially asked for a Batman to come help them with skyrocketing crime.

The mock petition, titled “Will it take Batman to save Marseille?” has thousands of signatures and a Facebook page for the group has more than 4,000 fans.

Europe’s current “Capital of Culture” is also considered “Europe’s most dangerous place to be young.”

More than a quarter of the 800,000 population is living below the poverty line, and there have been 13 gang-related killings so far this year. In 2012, authorities intercepted around 300 Kalashnikovs.

The French city’s quest for Batman comes following the death of pensioner Jacques Blondel, 61, who was shot dead trying to stop a robbery by first knocking the thieves over with his car then confronting them with a baseball bat.

The petition says increased police presence in the city hasn’t been effective at curbing crime rates, and accuses politicians of empty rhetoric and sound bites.

A Batman for Marseille aims to encourage Marseille residents to take their own security and not simply outbid opportunistic communication and political meningitis,” the petition says.

Holy maquisards, Batman!

Written by Ed Campbell

August 27, 2013 at 11:00 am

Greece ready to end free police protection for rich

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The rich can hire their children

Wealthy Greeks fearing attacks by anarchist groups will no longer be entitled to free police bodyguards in the latest cost-cutting plan from a government trying to meet budget targets set by international creditors.

The Public Order Ministry said on Tuesday that individuals with a net income of more than 100,000 euros a year will have to pay for their own police protection from potential terrorist and organised crime attacks.

Under the plan, they will have to pay 2,000 euros per month for each officer acting as a bodyguard and a daily fee of 50 euros for use of a patrol car.

…Private citizens currently receiving police protection include prominent businessmen and journalists who have been repeatedly threatened by anarchist groups, though few of the warnings have been specific.

But there has been a resurgence of attacks lately amid growing public hostility toward those, whether in the public or private sector, seen as corrupt and incompetent and blamed for Greece’s economic crisis.

It is the latest in a series of austerity measures that the Greek government has had to enact in recent years in return for bailout cash to avoid bankruptcy

The country is in its sixth year of recession and the country’s unemployment rate has spiked to over 25 percent…

Just about everything that could go wrong in Greece has done so. On one side, nutball anarchists start brawls when they’re not busy trying to blow up anything that smells like representative democracy – on the other, fascist gangs never quite disappeared from the map of history, trace their roots back to Hitlerian collaborators. Local coppers are ordered to leave both sides free to kill each other. And get in trouble themselves when they clout some petty bourgeois lout.

The modern flavors of Left and Right wobble along trying solve questions of consumption through unfunded public jobs or dancing the Greek imitation of the David Stockman polka – which requires the tears of unemployed to synchronize with IMF anal retentives singing hymns of praise to German Christian Democracy.

Written by Ed Campbell

July 31, 2013 at 8:00 am

Brasilia police cancel embarrassing order for World Cup raincoats

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They’re safe even if Kaka prays for rain!

Brasilia police have canceled an order for 17,000 raincoats for use at the World Cup because next year’s tournament will be played in the dry season…”The military police made a mistake in listing the product among those to be acquired with a view to the World Cup which will be held in the dry season,” said the Federal District government…

Brazilian media had criticized the plans as an example of wasteful spending by authorities, pointing out that the jackets would have cost a total of $2.66 million.

Rainfall is very rare between May and July in Brasilia and the air humidity often drops to 30 percent.

The Brazilian capital, a planned city founded in 1960, will stage five matches at the World Cup and will also host games at the Confederations Cup in June.

Most of the proper football fans I know are hoping for a successful tournament. What really counts is getting to watch our favorite sport without interference from greedy grasping businessmen and their kissing cousins in politics.

Written by Ed Campbell

May 6, 2013 at 2:00 am

Businessman going to jail for selling phony bomb detectors

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A British businessman was convicted Tuesday of selling gussied-up golf ball detectors as devices that could detect bombs, drugs and even diamonds.

Jim McCormick, 57, faces a substantial prison term for fraud, the Evening Standard reported. Investigators said he made millions of dollars selling useless detectors for as much as $40,000 each, with customers that included the Iraqi military…

Trial witnesses included Belgian Police Superintendent Theiry Meunier, who described his experience with one of McCormick’s devices.

“It was not only the cheapest machine, it was the only machine,” Meunier said. “We had no results from it. We tried to use the device for detecting drugs in cars for several months. We also provided the detector to detectives seeking to detect drugs. The results again were negative.”

McCormick, who lives in the Bath area, went on trial in March after a three-year investigation by Avon and Somerset police.

Investigators said he put lives at risk by selling a device that might give security officers a false sense of confidence.

While McCormick has continued to maintain his devices do the job they were supposed to, police, prosecutors and unhappy customers say they are simply golf-ball detectors given a fancy look and fancy marketing.

There’s some sort of object lesson inside this farce. Maybe something to do with the folks in charge of detecting crime, providing security against fraud – unable to figure out on the spot when they’re being hustled, eh?

Written by Ed Campbell

April 24, 2013 at 2:00 am

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