Eideard

Posts Tagged ‘WW2

Remembering absent friends

leave a comment »

I presume these Canadian troops are marching away from a memorial to those who fell during the liberation of Belgium during World War 2. Yes, I remember all of those days.

My best friend died a few years back. He was the most decorated soldier from our home state in WW2. He had 16 months in hospital to reflect upon how he got there – not just the German soldier who threw a hand grenade at him at the liberation of a death camp; but, the corporate and political creeps who helped scum like Hitler into power.

We learned a lot together over the years. Both of our families came to the US from Canada, btw. His family from Montreal and mine from PEI.

I salute you, too, Clyde.

Thanks, Mister Justin

About these ads

Written by Ed Campbell

November 10, 2013 at 2:00 pm

The Holocaust just became more shocking – to some

with 2 comments

Thirteen years ago, researchers at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum began the grim task of documenting all the ghettos, slave labor sites, concentration camps and killing factories that the Nazis set up throughout Europe.

What they have found so far has shocked even scholars steeped in the history of the Holocaust.

The researchers have cataloged some 42,500 Nazi ghettos and camps throughout Europe, spanning German-controlled areas from France to Russia and Germany itself, during Hitler’s reign of brutality from 1933 to 1945.

The figure is so staggering that even fellow Holocaust scholars had to make sure they had heard it correctly when the lead researchers previewed their findings at an academic forum in late January at the German Historical Institute in Washington.

“The numbers are so much higher than what we originally thought,” Hartmut Berghoff, director of the institute, said in an interview after learning of the new data.

“We knew before how horrible life in the camps and ghettos was,” he said, “but the numbers are unbelievable.”

The documented camps include not only “killing centers” but also thousands of forced labor camps, where prisoners manufactured war supplies; prisoner-of-war camps; sites euphemistically named “care” centers, where pregnant women were forced to have abortions or their babies were killed after birth; and brothels, where women were coerced into having sex with German military personnel.

Auschwitz and a handful of other concentration camps have come to symbolize the Nazi killing machine in the public consciousness. Likewise, the Nazi system for imprisoning Jewish families in hometown ghettos has become associated with a single site — the Warsaw Ghetto, famous for the 1943 uprising. But these sites, infamous though they are, represent only a minuscule fraction of the entire German network, the new research makes painfully clear.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ed Campbell

March 5, 2013 at 8:00 am

Glass Farm echoes traditional local architecture

with one comment


Click to enlarge

…Glass Farm is MVRDV’s seventh proposal for a new building at the market square in Schijndel in the Netherlands. During World War II the square was badly damaged in the unsuccessful Allied counter-offensive, Operation Market Garden. Since that time the square has undergone redevelopment and refurbished, though the idea of a centerpiece to the square’s rejuvenation – a new building between the church and town hall – proved controversial.

Schijndel happens to the home town of MVRDV co-founder Winy Maas. He first proposed a new building at the location in 1980. Twenty years later, the town council bought into the idea, and the conversation could move onto the issue of what should be built: no less prickly an issue, it turned out, and one which invigorated local residents.

Having had six of its ideas rejected, including one for a theater, MVRDV conceived the Glass Farm. Looking at the maximum “envelope” (the shell formed by its outer walls) allowed by the planning authority, MVRDV noticed that, though bigger, it matched the shape of the traditional farm buildings of the region.

MVRDV reasoned that if the building was to adopt the shape of a farm house, it should adopts their look too. Unfortunately, an actual farmhouse wouldn’t best serve what had become the purpose of the building: a multifunctional public facility housing restaurants, shops and the like. Instead, MVRDV decided that the building should be a glass shell which somehow took on the appearance of a farm.

The answer MVRDV came up with was fritted glass. Artist Frank van der Salm photographed the surviving traditional farm buildings in the region, and from his photographs a theoretical representation of the average or ideal farm building was composed. By fritting the glass, the image of the farm building was effectively printed onto it.

Being glass, the building lets in and out a certain amount of light. Cleverly, the translucence of the glass can be altered where desired so that certain parts of the building’s facade can behave more like conventional windows where extra light or a clear view out are beneficial. And because the building is glass, when lit up at night, the whole farm building appears to glow. Whether viewing from inside during the day or from outside at night, the effect is conceived to be reminiscent of stained glass.

Delightful, inventive, and it carries the village past into the town present.

Written by Ed Campbell

February 6, 2013 at 8:00 am

Pic of the Day

leave a comment »

Pearl Harbor survivor Stan Swartz bows his head after the national anthem at the 71st anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at the WW II Valor in the Pacific National Monument in Honolulu, Hawaii December 7, 2012.

Let us remember absent friends.

Written by Ed Campbell

December 8, 2012 at 4:00 pm

We remember absent friends

leave a comment »


REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

I remember my dearest friend – gone, now, a number of years – who was the most decorated soldier from our home state in World War 2.

Returning home, he had sixteen months or so in hospital to reflect on war. And when both political parties asked him to run for office after he got back on his feet – he told them he only required one plank in his platform. Corporations would be limited to no profits from their support of any war.

They withdrew the request.

Written by Ed Campbell

November 12, 2012 at 8:00 pm

Posted in Economics, Politics, War

Tagged with , , , , , ,

Landslip uncovers hundreds of deadly WW2 bombs and rockets

leave a comment »

A holiday beach was cordoned off after a landslip sent more than 1,000 deadly bombs and rockets embedded in the cliffs for more 60 years tumbling onto the sands.

The East Riding beach of Mappleton, near Hornsea, was used as a practice bombing range during the Second World War – but the bad weather has led to ground movement which exposed one of the biggest arsenals ever uncovered yesterday…

Coastguards say the odd item of explosives often turn up in dribs and drabs after being embedded in the cliffs for decades in the area.

But over the weekend, a landslip caused by the combination of heavy rain and coastal erosion exposed at least 1,000 weapons.

Coastguards say that most of them are probably dummy or practice rounds – but they still contain enough explosive to cause terrible injuries…

Army experts are hoping to remove some of the smaller items but some will have to be blown up on site in controlled explosions, Humber Coastguard said…

“Because there is such a great number of them what we do not want is people wandering around picking up the odd trophy to put on the mantel piece.

I wonder where I put the practice hand grenade I’ve been carrying around from place to place for 50 years or so? :)

Written by Ed Campbell

July 22, 2012 at 10:00 pm

Keep Calm and Carry On

with one comment


 
This video is about the tale of one of the best remembered slogans of the war. To many, “the war” means only one war. World War 2.

Click on this link and it will take you to a newly released series of posters from the war. Some of us remember it all. Including those who didn’t come back – and some of our closest friends and relatives who did return, grievously wounded in the war against fascism.

Thanks, Ursarodinia

Written by Ed Campbell

June 25, 2012 at 2:00 am

German city spared disruption over WW2 bomb. It ain’t a bomb!

leave a comment »


What the neighborhood looked like in 1945

German authorities have scrapped plans to cordon off part of the city of Stuttgart and shut its main station after discovering a suspected World War II bomb was actually an old water pipe.

Officials had announced that the station, a major railway hub, would be shut for several hours Sunday while experts defused the bomb, found in a nearby park. But city police said experts – on closer examination early Sunday – had determined the object was actually a cast-iron pipe that wasn’t marked on any map.

That meant authorities no longer needed to evacuate a 325-meter radius around the site or ask local residents to leave.

Unexploded World War II bombs are still found frequently in Germany, sometimes leading to large-scale evacuations as a precaution.

By the end of WW2, the whole country had so much new metal here and there we’re lucky it didn’t tilt the Earth.

Written by Ed Campbell

March 26, 2012 at 10:00 pm

Happy 95th Birthday – Vera Lynn

with 2 comments


 
Thanks, Eddy Elfenbein

Written by Ed Campbell

March 20, 2012 at 12:00 pm

Is this a record? Pensioner eats 64-year-old lard…

with one comment

A German pensioner who received a tin of American lard 64 years ago in an aid package has only just tasted it, after discovering that it is still edible.

“I just didn’t want to throw it away,” said Hans Feldmeier, 87. I love my fellow pack rats.

Food safety experts in Rostock, his home town on Germany’s Baltic coast, said the pig fat was still safe to eat.

Mr Feldmeier was a student in 1948 when the US was running a huge aid programme to rebuild war-ravaged Germany. He kept the tin of lard for emergencies…

A food expert, Frerk Feldhusen, said the lard was rather gritty and tasteless and hard to dissolve, though quite edible. Mr Feldmeier provided some black bread to go with it.

The red, white and blue tin of Swift’s Bland Lard bore no expiry date.

Eeoough!

A debate my wife and I have all the time. Yes, it’s a guy thing. I mostly come down on the side of eating old stuff.

After all, it works for cheese and most wine.

Written by Ed Campbell

February 2, 2012 at 9:00 am

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,796 other followers