Scientists find a Jurassic sea monster that could crush a Hummer


Daylife/Reuters Pictures

A giant fossil sea monster found in the Arctic and known as “Predator X” had a bite that would make T-Rex look feeble.

The 50 ft long Jurassic era marine reptile had a crushing 33,000 lbs per square inch bite force, the Natural History Museum of Oslo University said of the new find on the Norwegian Arctic archipelago of Svalbard…

“The calculation is one of the largest bite forces ever calculated for any creature,” the Museum said of the bite, estimated with the help of evolutionary biologist Greg Erickson from Florida State University.

Predator X’s bite was more than 10 times more powerful than any modern animal and four times the bite of a T-Rex, it said of the fossil, reckoned at 147 million years old.

Joern Hurum had said of the first fossil pliosaur that it was big enough to chomp on a small car. He said the bite estimates for the latest fossil forced a rethink.

This one is more like it could crush a Hummer,” he said…

Cripes. We have nothing else to do with leftover Hummers. Let’s take a few out to the deeps of the Pacific and troll for Pliosaurs.

2 thoughts on “Scientists find a Jurassic sea monster that could crush a Hummer

  1. jakal18 says:

    cool, but fifty feet is really not that big, around 200 ft is big, its my own personal opinion. big jaws, small body? i m offically confused. the other dinosaur that was being devouered was at least 50 ft, the other beast was about 100-200 ft based on jaw size..

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