Tough woman cop who makes a difference – is Fort Hood hero

The police officer who ended the Fort Hood massacre by shooting the suspect is known as the enforcer on her street, a “tough woman” who patrolled her neighborhood and once stopped burglars at her house.

“If you come in, I’m going to shoot,” Kimberly Munley told the would-be intruders last year.

It was Munley who arrived quickly Thursday at the scene of the worst massacre at an Army base in U.S. history, where 13 people were killed. She confronted the alleged gunman, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, and shot him four times. Munley was wounded in the exchange.

That’s just like her, friends and family say…

Munley, the mother of a 3-year-old girl, lives on a street where a lot of homes are vacant because so many residents are deployed at war in Iraq and Afghanistan…

We sleep a lot safer knowing she’s on the block,” said Sgt. William Barbrow, another neighbor…

Her bio on Twitter makes the point: “I live a good life….a hard one, but I go to sleep peacefully @ night knowing that I may have made a difference in someone’s life.”

You surely made a difference, this time.

6 thoughts on “Tough woman cop who makes a difference – is Fort Hood hero

  1. Jägermeister says:

    Yes, she’s a hero. But I sincerely hope that this shooting won’t bury other stories, like for instance September 11 and Columbine did.

  2. Cinaedh says:

    It has always seemed strange to me in the United States when a cop does his/her job, they’re exalted as some sort of super hero/heroine.

    It’s a rare occasion.

    In the United States when a cop fucks up, they’re the devil incarnate.

    That’s not so rare.

    • moss says:

      A copper putting his/her life on the line is a stretch that the average badge hopefully will not have to confront. That makes it all the more difficult when they have to.

      All kinds enter the force for all kind of reasons.

      I had on uncle on the NYPD who used his gun a few times; but, preferred to wade in with his club if he could – presuming he wouldn’t kill anyone.

      OTOH, I recall an electrician I worked with in an institutional engineering dept who joined the local force. Surprised, I asked him why he was joining – his answer was he could get all the drugs he would ever want – for free.

      • Jägermeister says:

        “A copper putting his/her life on the line is a stretch that the average badge hopefully will not never have to confront.”

        Fixed that for you.

        “That makes it all the more difficult when they have to.”

        That’s what they train for… Just like the folks in the military. Most military personnel never face life or death situations, but they train for it.

  3. Mr. Fusion says:

    Since the Reagan era we have redefined the word “hero”. Today, it seems anyone who joins the military, fights a fire, or gets out of their patrol car is a hero.

    While I wouldn’t want to diminish what this woman did, honestly, I think 95% of people in the same circumstance would have done the same. If we felt it was our job and were armed we would put our self between the shooter and the public. If we fought fires and knew someone was inside, we would do what we could to rescue them.

    And I am very sure that there are many people in Fort Hood happy she was there. However you define “hero”.

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