New snoop system records public conversations

A controversial covert surveillance system that records the public’s conversations is being used in Britain.

The technology, called Sigard, monitors movements and speech to detect signs of threatening behaviour. Its designers claim the system can anticipate anti-social behaviour and violence by analysing the information picked up its sensors.

They say alerts are then sent to police, nightclub bouncers or shop security staff, which allow them to nip trouble in the bud before arguments spiral into violence…

The system, produced by Sound Intelligence, is being used in Dutch prisons, city centres and Amsterdam’s Central Rail Station.

Leave it to the Brits. They’ll figure out how best to use it to inhibit civil liberties.

Coventry City Council is funding a pilot project which has been used for six months and has installed seven devices in the nightlife area on the High Street.

Dylan Sharpe, from Big Brother Watch, said: “There can be no justification for giving councils or the police the capability to listen in on private conversations.

“There is enormous potential for abuse, or a misheard word, causing unnecessary harm with this sort of intrusive and overbearing surveillance.”

The new Coalition Government has announced a review of the use of CCTV with a pledge to tilt the balance away from snooping by the authorities to defend civil liberties.

Not that anything noticeable has happened, yet.

4 thoughts on “New snoop system records public conversations

  1. honorarynewfie says:

    I thought electrical equipment always needed some form of air vent to stop it from overheating.
    On a totally unrelated subject… that expanding foam that builders use is good stuff, isn’t it ? 😉

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