Sperm may be harmed by exposure to BPA


“I’m too tired to finish”

In one of the first human studies of its kind, researchers have found that urinary concentrations of the controversial chemical Bisphenol A, or BPA, may be related to decreased sperm quality and sperm concentration.

However, the researchers are quick to point out that these results are preliminary and more study is needed. Several studies have documented adverse effects of BPA on semen in rodents, but none are known to have reported similar relationships in humans.

BPA is a common chemical that’s stirred much controversy in the media lately over its safety. Critics say that BPA mimics the body’s own hormones and may lead to negative health effects. BPA is most commonly used to make plastics and epoxy resins used in food and beverage cans, and people are exposed primarily through diet, although other routes are possible. More than 6 billion pounds of BPA are produced annually.

“Much of the focus for BPA is on the exposures in utero or in early life, which is of course extremely important, but this suggests exposure may also be a concern for adults,” Meeker said. “Research should focus on impacts of exposure throughout multiple life stages…”

John Meeker and Russ Hauser recruited 190 men through a fertility clinic. All gave spot urine samples and sperm samples the same day. Subsequently, 78 of the men gave one or two additional urine samples a month apart. Researchers detected BPA in 89 percent of the urine samples…

“We found that if we compare somebody in the top quartile of exposure with the lowest quartile of exposure, sperm concentration was on average about 23 percent lower in men with the highest BPA,” Meeker said.

Results also suggested a 10 percent increase in sperm DNA damage.

So, all those guys sucking down Gatorade from 2-liter bottles on the sidelines of college football games – are limiting the ability of our species to reproduce?

No matter how hard they try?

4 thoughts on “Sperm may be harmed by exposure to BPA

  1. Rev. Malthus says:

    …given our species’ track record, perhaps it might be for the best if we lost the ability to reproduce ourselves.

  2. Doc says:

    “Common Coating used in Soft Drink Cans may cause High Blood Pressure” http://mainenewsonline.com/content/14122008-common-coating-used-soft-drink-cans-may-cause-high-blood “According to the new study conducted by the Korean researchers, ingesting BPA was connected with high blood pressure and alterations in heart rate. The study that included 60 adults over the age of 60 found that the concentration of BPA climb by up to 1,600 % after consuming canned drinks as compared with after consuming the glass-bottled beverages.”

  3. McGuire says:

    ‘BPA-free’ plastic accelerates embryonic development, disrupts reproductive system : UCLA research suggests common substitute for BPA is not safer http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-02/uoc–pa012816.php According to Nancy Wayne, a reproductive endocrinologist and a professor of physiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, “most people think of BPA as mimicking the effects of estrogen. But our work shows that it also mimics the actions of thyroid hormone. “Because of thyroid hormone’s important influence on brain development during gestation, our work holds important implications for general embryonic and fetal development, including in humans.” Researchers have proposed that endocrine-disrupting chemicals may be contributing to the U.S.’ rise in premature human births and early onset of puberty over the past couple of decades. “Our data support that hypothesis,” said Wayne. “If BPA is impacting a wide variety of animal species, then it’s likely to be affecting human health. Our study is the latest to help show this with BPA and now with BPS.” BPA can leach into food, particularly under heat, from the lining of cans and from consumer products such as water bottles, baby bottles, food-storage containers and plastic tableware. BPA can also be found in contact lenses, eyeglass lenses, compact discs, water-supply pipes, some cash register and ATM receipts, as well as in some dental sealants and composites. The U.S. and Europe were expected to manufacture more than 5 million tons of products containing the additives in 2015.”

  4. Doc says:

    “Low levels of BPA exposure may be considered safe, but new research published online in The FASEB [Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology] Journal, suggests otherwise. In the report, researchers from Yale show that the genome is permanently altered in the uterus of mice that had been exposed to BPA during their fetal development. These changes were found to mainly affect genes that are regulated by estrogen and are implicated in the formation of estrogen-related diseases such as infertility, endometriosis, endometrial cancer, osteoporosis, prostate cancer, neurodegenerative disease, obesity and breast cancer.
    “Our study demonstrates that fetal exposure to BPA leads to a detrimental change in the adult uterine response to estrogens,” said Hugh S. Taylor, M.D., a senior researcher involved in the work and Chief of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Yale-New Haven Children’s Hospital at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut. “Our study confirms that BPA is an active compound and can negatively impact fetal development and confirms that steps should be taken to reduce maternal consumption of BPA during gestation.” http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-06/foas-fbe061716.php Includes link to “Preferential epigenetic programming of estrogen response after in utero xenoestrogen (bisphenol-A) exposure.”

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