Hurricane Sandy exposes flaws in sewer systems


Replacing water pumps destroyed at the Bay Park sewage treatment plant

The water flowing out of the Bay Park sewage plant here in Nassau County is a greenish-gray soup of partially treated human waste, a sign of an environmental and public health disaster that officials say will be one of the most enduring and expensive effects of Hurricane Sandy.

In the month since the storm, hundreds of millions of gallons of raw and partly raw sewage from Bay Park and other crippled treatment plants have flowed into waterways in New York and New Jersey, exposing flaws in the region’s wastewater infrastructure that could take several years and billions of dollars to fix. In New York State alone, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo has estimated that about $1.1 billion will be needed to repair treatment plants. But officials acknowledge that they will have to do far more.

Motors and electrical equipment must be raised above newly established flood levels, and circuitry must be made waterproof. Dams and levees may have to be built at some treatment plants to keep the rising waters at bay, experts say.

Failure to do so, according to experts, could leave large swaths of the population vulnerable to public health and environmental hazards in future storms.

Poisonally, I think the bill should be hand-delivered to the Koch Bros., the Republican Party and the rest of the know-nothing dimwits still praying for the heavens to open and suck away our specie’s industrial pollution and the resulting climate change.

“You’re looking at significant expenditures of money to make the plants more secure,” said John Cameron, an engineer who specializes in wastewater-treatment facilities and is the chairman of the Long Island Regional Planning Council. “There is no Band-Aid for this,” he added. “This is the new normal.”

When the plants are fully functioning, they treat incoming sewage to remove solid waste and toxic substances and kill bacteria before it is discharged into the ocean or a bay. When the plants are shut down, the raw sewage goes into waterways in the same condition as when it comes in. At least six sewage plants in the New York region shut down completely during the storm, and many more were crippled by storm surges that swamped motors and caused short circuits in electrical equipment.

In New Jersey, workers at the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission plant, the fifth largest in the country, had to evacuate as floodwaters surged in and wastewater gushed out.

The Middlesex County Utility Authority plant in Sayreville, N.J., let about 75 million gallons of raw sewage a day flow into Raritan Bay for nearly a week before power was restored, said Larry Ragonese, a spokesman for the State Environmental Protection Department.

RTFA and weep, folks. Paragraph after paragraph of excuses, rationales, every bureaucrat repeating the mantra of anti-science stupidity: “It never happened before; so, we did nothing to prevent it.”

Idiots.

Sinkhole eats state highway in Ohio

In Ohio a massive sinkhole has eaten away part of a state highway and now threatens nearby houses as well. It’s estimated to be the size of four football fields.

The state highway has been badly damaged and will have to be closed for months.

The sinkhole began as a pond on land where the Newton Asphalt Company had been dredging for sand. The dredging may have eroded enough of the land near the pond to cause a collapse.

Think so?

It had happened so quickly that Newton employees had to run to the road to warn traffic the road had fallen in.

Experts think it could be well into 2013 before permanent repairs can be made.

If we’re lucky, the state of Ohio will award the repair bid to the Newton Asphalt Company – and they will provide more entertainment.

Harvard Doctor turns hedge fund profiteer, then, convict – after sentence for insider trading

From the age of six, Joseph F. “Chip” Skowron III aspired to be a doctor. At Yale, he earned both a medical degree and a doctorate in molecular and cellular biology, then qualified for Harvard’s elite, five-year residency program. Three years in, Skowron quit medicine for Wall Street. He and two partners started a group of health-care investment funds under the auspices of FrontPoint Partners LLC, a hot new property in the exploding world of hedge funds.

Skowron was soon making millions of dollars a year. He built a gabled, 10,000-square-foot home on three acres in the nation’s hedge-fund capital, Greenwich, Connecticut. He assembled a small fleet of pricey cars, including a 2006 Aston Martin Vanquish and a 2009 Alfa Romeo Spider 8C. He also spent vacation time engaged in Third World humanitarian causes…

Today, Skowron…is serving a five-year term for insider trading at the federal prison at Minersville, Pennsylvania. At FrontPoint, Skowron lied to his bosses and law enforcement authorities, cost more than 35 people their jobs and stooped to slipping envelopes of cash to an accomplice. FrontPoint is gone. Morgan Stanley, which once owned FrontPoint, is seeking more than $65 million from Skowron, whose net worth a year ago was $22 million. Until he’s a free man, his wife of 16 years will have to care for their four children and Rocky, their golden retriever, on her own…

Health care has become America’s sweet spot for insider traders like Skowron. Among researchers, physicians, government officials and corporate executives, the lure of easy money in health-care insider trading has become epidemic. Since 2008, about 400 people were sued by regulators or charged with insider trading; of those, at least 94 passed or received tips involving pharmaceutical, biotechnology or other health-care stocks.

RTFA for the cautionary tale of humanitarian physician – turned scumbag profiteer, insider trader on Wall Street.

Leicester scientists print out the human genome in 130 volumes

An exhibition on genomics – the study of genetic material which is driving major medical research innovations – has opened at Leicester’s New Walk Museum.

Inside DNA: A Genomic Revolution offers people the chance to learn more about genome research and have a say in the future policy of the science…

The University of Leicester’s Department of Genetics has printed out an entire human genome – amounting to 130 volumes of some 300 pages – which is going on display at the museum.

The work has been done by the Genetics Education Networking for Innovation and Excellence (Genie), based at the university.

Genie spokesman Dr Cas Kramer said: “Genie’s outreach programme has enabled us to develop workshops to further enhance the Inside DNA exhibit and we are very much looking forward to working with the museum over the next six months.”

Clare Matterson, from the Wellcome Trust, which funds the exhibition, said: “Over a decade since the first human genome was published, scientists are starting to get to grips with what the information in our DNA means for health and disease.

“Inside DNA is more relevant than ever, giving people a chance to explore issues raised by this research.”

Bravo!