Strangest Creatures on the Planet

Nature can produce some incredibly complex creatures. These creatures can defy the human imagination and are often unique to the species of animals that we know of today. While not all of these may be big and scary, we are going to talk about the top 10 fantastically strange animals in the world.

Most of us have heard of the octopus, but how many of us have heard of the “Blanket Octopus”? This sea-based creature is awkward to say the least and contains three hearts, a parrot-like beak, and venomous saliva. It also has the ability to change color on a whim so that it can adapt to its surroundings. A lot of people refer to their tentacles as “intelligent arms” as they don’t necessarily need the brain to perform specific actions like catching prey. All in all, this is a very strange animal that is rarely seen and resides in the depths of the ocean.

The blanket octopus is #9 on this list – and a personal favorite. Click the link above and wander through one editor’s choices.

6 thoughts on “Strangest Creatures on the Planet

  1. Puzzling Evidence says:

    “A controversial study has a new spin on the otherworldliness of the octopus” https://qz.com/1281064/a-controversial-study-has-a-new-spin-on-the-otherworldliness-of-the-octopus/
    “…A second focus is the remarkable evolution of intelligent complexity (Cephalopods) culminating in the emergence of the Octopus. A third focus concerns the micro-organism fossil evidence contained within meteorites as well as the detection in the upper atmosphere of apparent incoming life-bearing particles from space. In our view the totality of the multifactorial data and critical analyses assembled by Fred Hoyle, Chandra Wickramasinghe and their many colleagues since the 1960s leads to a very plausible conclusion – life may have been seeded here on Earth by life-bearing comets as soon as conditions on Earth allowed it to flourish (about or just before 4.1 Billion years ago); and living organisms such as space-resistant and space-hardy bacteria, viruses, more complex eukaryotic cells, fertilised ova and seeds have been continuously delivered ever since to Earth so being one important driver of further terrestrial evolution which has resulted in considerable genetic diversity and which has led to the emergence of mankind.” (Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology March 13, 2018) https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0079610718300798?via%3Dihub
    Panspermia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panspermia

  2. Malacologist says:

    “Scientists Gave MDMA to Octopuses—and What Happened Was Profound” https://gizmodo.com/scientists-gave-mdma-to-octopuses-and-what-happened-was-1829191638
    See also: “A Conserved Role for Serotonergic Neurotransmission in Mediating Social Behavior in Octopus” (Current Biology September 20, 2018) https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(18)30991-6?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS0960982218309916%3Fshowall%3Dtrue

  3. Memento mori says:

    “The final days of a female octopus after it reproduces are quite grim, at least to human eyes. Octopuses are semelparous animals, which means they reproduce once and then they die. After a female octopus lays a clutch of eggs, she quits eating and wastes away; by the time the eggs hatch, she dies. …The scientific jury is still out as to why these clever, resourceful creatures meet such an ignominious end, but there are several theories. Octopuses are serious cannibals, so a biologically programmed death spiral may be a way to keep mothers from eating their young.” (UChicago Medicine) https://www.uchicagomedicine.org/biological-sciences-articles/the-grim-final-days-of-a-mother-octopus

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