All the new tests for teachers give high passing grades

Across the country, education reformers and their allies in both parties have revamped the way teachers are graded, abandoning methods under which nearly everyone was deemed satisfactory, even when students were falling behind…

The changes, already under way in some cities and states, are intended to provide meaningful feedback and, critically, to weed out weak performers. And here are some of the early results:

In Florida, 97 percent of teachers were deemed effective or highly effective in the most recent evaluations. In Tennessee, 98 percent of teachers were judged to be “at expectations.” In Michigan, 98 percent of teachers were rated effective or better.

Advocates of education reform concede that such rosy numbers, after many millions of dollars developing the new systems and thousands of hours of training, are worrisome…

The teachers might be rated all above average, like students in Lake Wobegon, for the same reason that the older evaluation methods were considered lacking. Principals, who are often responsible for the personal-observation part of the grade, generally are not detached managerial types and can be loath to give teachers low marks…

But even the part of the grade that was intended to be objective, how students perform on standardized tests, has proved squishy. In part, this is because tests have changed so much in recent years — and are changing still, because of the new “Common Core” curriculum standards that most states have adopted — that administrators have been unwilling to set the test-score bar too high for teachers. In many states, consecutive “ineffective” ratings are grounds for firing…

The new evaluation systems have been closely scrutinized in the education world by policy makers, publications like Education Week, and foundations that have provided money to help perfect the methods…

Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, said that even though the data from these systems “was not ready for prime time,” it proved what she had long argued: That the majority of teachers are very good…

RTFA for lots of anecdotal information – which, in my mind, doesn’t answer any questions about the lousy overall capabilities of graduates. None of this addresses dropout rates. None of this seems to confront the whole decline in education over the past half-century.

What has been discussed to death is how to blame the teachers. That seems to bear no fruit at all. What hasn’t been discussed especially is what constitutes a useful curriculum – and how much teaching professionals don’t get to participate. Between Congress, the White House, state and local school boards, we have no end of politicians chiming in. They don’t even take the time to examine what worked in the past, what works, now, in other lands.

I’ll offer something I rarely do – the “back in my day” examination. Aside from walking to school in knee-deep snowstorms and the other crap that people think they recall 🙂 – a couple of facts are incontrovertible. The elementary school I attended in a New England factory town was mostly kids from workingclass families. Pretty average teachers – probably not unlike today’s flavor. Dropout rate was less than 5%. We completed the tasks assigned.

I attended high school in the next town over – we moved. A semi-rural town rapidly becoming a commuter suburb. Teachers were about the same. Dropout rate was less than 3%. We all completed the curriculum. I enjoyed school, learned a lot, probably learned even more on my own or in studies with my parents; but, they and I wanted more than acceptable.

Now, living in northern New Mexico, the school system truly hopes to get “up” to the national average of 20% dropouts. We couldn’t get a law passed allowing schools to hold back students with failing marks to repeat the grade. Mom and dad can overrule the school and demand their child be bumped ahead into the next grade even when unable to do the work.

From my perspective, this fits into the phenomena I saw happening broadly across our education system starting in the 1960’s. If the kiddies felt learning something was too hard, too difficult, the schools were mandated to pass them along, anyway. You weren’t to hurt their sensibilities – though, frankly, I never saw anything sensible coming from kids who preferred not to learn.

That’s only a small subjective look at the question. I wanted to offer it because I don’t see anyone who’s in charge doing anything at all useful. That includes BTW the whole Charter School copout. Which has a failure rate worse than our public schools.

2 thoughts on “All the new tests for teachers give high passing grades

  1. J. Palmer says:

    The focus on school/teacher accountability is primarily responsible for America’s falling educational rankings. As things have gotten progressively worse, the focus on schools and teachers has only intensified. Why? Because there is NO means of holding parents accountable for their children’s behavior or academic performance. None. And considering the way that federal funding is tied to graduation rates, there is actually a disincentive for schools to hold students accountable for their academic performance. Instead schools are passing students along by any means necessary in order to salvage what little they can of their eroding operating budgets.

    What really gets me is how G. W. Bush was the one who championed the legislation that removed all responsibility from students (i.e. No Child Left Behind). Bush completely abandoned his own conservative political philosophy by implementing a system which explicitly removed the individual freedom to fail in favor of institutional control that rewarded apathy and created dependence on the school system rather than self-reliance.

  2. Jeff Nguyen says:

    The new Common Core curriculum was developed with little input from teachers or research to support its implementation. Standardized assessments are still being developed based on the new national curriculum that was tied directly to Race to the Top funding. Once again multinational corporations like Pearson hit the jackpot while states and local districts starve for funding. And the most inconvenient truth of them all, poverty, is ignored by the ed “reformers”.

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