Judge orders stripper’s life savings returned with interest…one year after state trooper confiscated it as drug money

A Californian stripper will have her life savings of over $1 million returned to her almost a year after it was confiscated by a Nebraska State Trooper who thought it was drugs money.

Exotic dancer, Tasha Mishra, 33, of Rancho Cucamonga, will be reunited with $1,074,900 plus interest, after Judge Joseph F. Batailon today found no evidence that the money was to be used in a drug dealing operation.

The million dollar fortune had been amassed by Mishra over the course of 15 years and was intended by her to be used to buy a nightclub in New Jersey and get her out of the stripping business…

Nebraska State troopers confiscated the cash on March 3rd 2012 when they pulled over Rajesh and Marina Dheri, of Montville, New Jersey, for speeding…

The Dheri’s are friends of Mishra and had been handed the cash by Mishra two days earlier and they were transporting the money across the country after flying into Los Angeles to meet the millionaire dancer.

Nebraska State Patrol Trooper Ryan Hayes issued Rajesh Dheri with a speeding ticket and then asked the couple if they were carrying anything illegal in the car such as drugs.

The Dheri’s said no and gave Hayes permission to search the Mercedes SUV they had rented two days prior.

The troopers discovered two drawstring bags containing rubber-banded bundles of cash in $100s and then seized it, believing it was related to narcotics.

The Dheri’s told the troopers that the money was for a nightclub that they and a friend were to buy in New Jersey but a drug sniffing dog found traces of narcotics on the money.

Presumably coppers know – as well as you and I know – that all American money bears traces of drugs.

Objecting, the Dheri’s told the troopers to phone Mishra who informed them the money was hers. Regardless, the U.S. Attorney’s office proceeded with confiscating the cash – telling Mishra she had no legal right to object because she was not in the car…

‘In any event, that claimant Tara Mishra earned her money by lap dancing and nude dancing does not mean that a Nebraska State Trooper can take her life savings,’ Mishra’s attorney Roger Diamond told the Journal Star…

joseph_f-_bataillon_district_judge

U.S. attorney Nancy Svoboda said blah, blah, blah.’

Judge Bataillon ruled otherwise after Mishra provided evidence of earnings on tax returns and paper details of the agreement to buy the bar in new Jersey…

In general, Bataillon said, the government ‘left too many unanswered questions and had a general failure of proof in this case.’ – according to the Journal Star.

He directed the government to return the money, plus interest since the day it was taken.

Always nice to see the little guy win one against ignorant coppers, blindered bureaucrats and the government. I wish Tasha Mishra and her associates well in their new business.

I suppose I should say I hope officials in the Nebraska State Police learned something from this disaster – but, frankly, I think that’s unlikely. Change is too difficult for people who run their lives like a mass-produced comic book.

Thanks, Ursarodinia

3 thoughts on “Judge orders stripper’s life savings returned with interest…one year after state trooper confiscated it as drug money

  1. Nik DeWitt says:

    As I’ve been saying for years, law enforcement has been turned into nothing more than a source of revenue for local and national government. It started when they gave themselves the right to impound any property for reason that it might have been gained by means of illegal activity, whether they could prove it or not. It is time to reign in law enforcement, whether it involves confiscation of private property, intimidation of the public, the shooting of unarmed citizens or just spending tax money indiscriminately on things like 160 MPH cars for general police work.

  2. News item says:

    The American Civil Liberties Union of New Mexico and The Charles Koch Institute, two groups that arguably have differing opinions on many things, appeared on the same same stage in Albuquerque on Wednesday to discuss civil asset forfeiture. New Mexico ended the practice of civil asset forfeiture earlier this year. Representatives from the two groups, along with a criminal defense attorney and a former director of the Justice Department’s Asset Forfeiture Office, discussed the importance of reforming states’ laws regarding asset forfeiture. Steven Robert Allen from the ACLU of New Mexico spoke about how his group took two years to help recover money seized from a father and son traveling through New Mexico. The now-familiar story was frequently told when Allen, Gessing and former New Mexico Attorney General Hal Stratton pushed for the reform bill during the 2015 legislative session. The forum was part of a national series hosted by the Charles Koch Institute aimed at looking at criminal justice reform. http://nmpoliticalreport.com/16872/civil-asset-forfeiture-forum-draws-unlikely-allies/

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