Some teachers in a Connecticut town banned students from “Hump Day” recitation

Geico advertising execs would be pleased to know that their talking camel “Hump Day” commercial is so catchy, Connecticut middle schoolers quote it all week along. In fact, some teachers have banned their students from referencing it, calling the incessant quotations “disruptive.”

“Everybody’s walking around in the hallways and saying its hump day in that weird voice,” Vernon Center student Brooke Lewis told WFSB.

“Sometimes its the counting down to when it is,” Lewis said.

Kids aren’t the commercial’s only fans. CBS News reported last month that “Hump Day” was the most-shared ad of the summer.

“If you look at the tracking chart, the irony of it is it actually makes a hump, and it spikes on Wednesdays, which is what more could you ask for,” said Wade Alger, the Martin Agency ad man in charge of Geico’s account…

Even the White House quotes it:

WH Hump Day

Here’s the full ad:

The call-and-response aspect of the commercial can’t be ignored. Students one side of the hall shouting “Guess what day it is?” Others responding “It’s Hump Day!”

I can recall being in the bleachers at a Red Sox game when part of the crowd would shout “Tastes great!” and the appropriate response was “Less filling!” All over a crap beer commercial.

But, I have to admit – this is my current fave advert, too.

Dumb crook of the day

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Police in New Jersey said they arrested a man accused of mistakenly sending a text message to a police officer seeking a buyer for marijuana…Andover Township Police said Lt. Eric Danielson, who had recently purchased a new cellphone with a new number, received a text message around 7:45 p.m. on a Friday from a person who offered a quarter pound of marijuana for sale…

Sgt. John-Paul Beebe said Danielson arranged to meet with the sender of the message, later identified as Nicholas Delear Jr., 33, and an undercover police officer met with Delear in the parking lot of a pizzeria in Sparta at 8:15 p.m.

Delear became suspicious and attempted the leave the area before completing the deal, but he was stopped by a Sparta Police vehicle a short time later.

Beebe said the suspect denied any knowledge of the texts and refused consent for officers to search his car, so a K-9 unit was dispatched. Danielson arrived on the scene and was able to confirm the text messages he received came from Delear’s number.

The K-9 unit indicated the presence of drugs in the vehicle and a Superior Court judge granted a telephonic search warrant.

Police said they found more than an ounce of marijuana in the car along with a scale and $620 in cash.

Delear was arrested on charges of possession with intent to distribute marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a controlled dangerous substance in a motor vehicle and several motor vehicle infractions.

There is no criminal charge for dumb.

Are you ready to wear this?


Click to enlargeREUTERS/Benoit Tessier

A model presents a creation by U.S. designer Marc Jacobs as part of his Spring/Summer 2014 women’s ready-to-wear fashion show for French fashion house Louis Vuitton during Paris fashion week.

Ready-to-wear this to what? Signing yourself in for group therapy?

China’s capital to begin replacing some coal-fired plants


Auld Reekie

China will replace four coal-burning heating plants in the capital Beijing with natural gas fired ones by the end of next year as it steps up efforts to clean up pollution…

The report, citing the city’s Municipal Commission of Development and Reform, said the four plants and some 40 other related projects would cost around $8 billion and cut sulphur dioxide emissions by 10,000 metric tons. It did not detail the related projects.

The plan is the latest step by authorities to deal with a persistent smog crisis in China’s big cities that is fuelling public anger. The capital has been shrouded in thick hazardous smog for several days during the ongoing seven-day national holiday.

China has been under pressure to tackle air pollution to douse potential unrest as an increasingly affluent urban populace turns against a growth-at-all-costs economic model that has besmirched much of China’s air, water and soil.

Last month the government announced plans to slash coal consumption and close polluting mills, factories and smelters, though experts said implementing the targets would be a major challenge.

The new plants will replace four coal-fired ones that provide heating for homes in the city’s central urban area as well as generating electricity, Xinhua said.

Beijing is the Auld Reekie of the 21st Century. For those of you who don’t know the term, it described Edinburgh [and London] not only in the years before World War 2, but, especially afterwards during the efforts to ramp industrial production back up to speed in the UK.

Then, as now, though industrial use was a significant portion of the air pollution, everyone’s attachment to their wee coal fire heating the main rooms of home was a tough cultural obstacle – just as central to established urban life in Beijing. The solution has to be the same – replacing those coal fires with natural gas or electricity generated by means other than burning coal.

The cost of bringing large volumes of natural gas to locations in and around Beijing also lays the groundwork for local provision and access to that cleaner substitute for coal. Smart idea.