Linguistic Family Tree


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When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor. An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian).

Lessons on language families are often illustrated with a simple tree diagram that has all the information but lacks imagination. There’s no reason linguistics has to be so visually uninspiring. Minna Sundberg, creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent, a story set in a lushly imagined post-apocalyptic Nordic world, has drawn the antidote to the boring linguistic tree diagram.

Thanks, Ursarodinia

Century-old Antarctic expedition notebook recovered from snow and ice

Hidden in ice for more than 100 years, the photography notebook of a British explorer on Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s ill-fated expedition to Antarctica has been found.

The book belonged to George Murray Levick, a surgeon, zoologist and photographer on Scott’s 1910-1913 voyage. Levick might be best remembered for his observations of Cape Adare’s Adélie penguins (and his scandalized descriptions of the birds’ “depraved” sex lives). The newly discovered book also shows he kept fastidious notes, scrawled in pencil, about the photographs he took at Cape Adare.

Levick’s “Wellcome Photographic Exposure Record and Dairy 1910” had been left behind at Captain Scott’s last expedition base at Cape Evans. Conservationists discovered the notebook outside the hut during last year’s summer melt…

The book has notes detailing the date, subjects and exposure details from his photographs. In his notes, Levick refers to a self-portrait he took while shaving in a hut at Cape Adare and shots he took of his fellow crewmembers as they set up theodolites (instruments for surveying) and fish traps and sat in kayaks.

One hundred years of damage from ice and water dissolved the notebook’s binding. The pages were separated and digitized before the book was put back together again with new binding and sent back to Antarctica, where the Antarctic Heritage Trust maintains 11,000 artifacts at Cape Evans…

Cripes, I love finds like this.

I did some work for a spell with a small team that searched old abandoned homes. Brought out amazing artifacts and diaries from the 18th and 19th centuries. Often, we’d only find a roof lying on the ground with a collapsed dwelling underneath. Propping up a corner, we’d – very carefully – crawl in and mine what we could.

Hinode satellite recorded X-ray footage of solar eclipse


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On October 23rd, while North America was witnessing a partial eclipse of the sun, the Hinode spacecraft observed a “ring of fire” or annular eclipse from its location hundreds of miles above the North Pole. This image was taken by the X-ray Telescope – the XRT.

The Hinode spacecraft was in the right place at the right time to catch the solar eclipse. What’s more, because of its vantage point Hinode witnessed a “ring of fire” or annular eclipse…

…The XRT was developed and built by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Hinode’s X-ray Telescope is the highest resolution solar X-ray telescope ever flown.

The XRT collects X-rays emitted from the sun’s corona — the hot, tenuous outer layer that extends from the sun’s visible surface into the inner solar system. Gas in the solar corona reaches temperatures of millions of degrees. The energy source that heats the corona is a puzzle. The sun’s surface is only 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit, while the corona is more than 100 times hotter.

Science is so beautiful. But, then, the quest for truth always is.

Thanks, Ursarodinia