How’s that NRA gun safety program working out for you?

A three-year-old American boy has shot his mother and father with the same bullet after pulling a gun from her handbag…

The incident took place in a motel room on Saturday afternoon in Albuquerque in the state of New Mexico…

The bullet passed through his father’s buttock and hit his mother, who is eight months pregnant, in the arm. Both parents are said to be recovering.

The boy’s two-year-old sister, who was also in the room at the America’s Best Value Inn, was unhurt.

Justin Reynolds told NBC News station KOB he and his girlfriend Monique Villescas were about to order a pizza when he heard the shot.

“The next minute I realised my girlfriend was bleeding. Then I sat down and realised I was shot too.”

He called emergency services and tried to staunch Ms Villescas’s bleeding with towels.

He said: “I was more worried about my girlfriend than myself and anything else that was going on. And my son because I didn’t know if he had shot himself or not. He was shocked and crying. It was traumatising.”

Mr Reynolds has been released from hospital and Ms Villescas is in a stable condition.

Albuquerque police said the district attorney’s office would decide whether the parents would face negligence charges. The children have been taken into care.

No doubt the couple will receive defense at no cost from the NRA if they are charged for their negligence. As far as the NRA is concerned even accidentally shooting your family is covered by the 2nd Amendment.

Shot by Albuquerque coppers — “I regret to inform you your son is deceased”

christopher torres

Stephen Torres was meeting with a client at his law office, in downtown Albuquerque, on April 12, 2011, when he received a call from a neighbor, who told him that police officers were aiming rifles at his house. He left work and drove to his home, in a middle-class suburb with a view of the mountains. There were more than forty police vehicles on his street. Officers wearing camouflage fatigues and bulletproof vests had circled his home, a sand-colored two-story house with a pitched tile roof. Two officers were driving a remote-controlled robot, used for discharging bombs, back and forth on the corner.

Stephen’s wife, Renetta, the director of human resources for the county, arrived a few minutes later, just after three o’clock. A colleague had heard her address repeated on the police radio, so her assistant pulled her out of a meeting. When Renetta saw that the street was cordoned off with police tape, she tried to walk to her house, but an officer told her that she couldn’t enter the “kill zone…”

Renetta knew that the only person at home was the youngest of her three boys, Christopher, who was twenty-seven and had schizophrenia. Two hours earlier, he had stopped by her office for lunch, as he did a few times a week. Then he visited an elderly couple who lived two houses away. He said that he needed to “check up on them”; he often cleaned their pool or drove them to the grocery store. Because he found it overwhelming to spend too much time among people, he tried to do small, social errands, so as not to isolate himself…

At around five-thirty, a female officer stepped out of a mobile crime unit, an R.V. where detectives processed evidence, and waved the family over. “She was so detached,” Renetta said. “All she said was ‘I regret to inform you that your son is deceased.’ ” She did not tell them how their son had died or where they could find his body. The Torreses asked if they could go home, but the officer said that it was still an active crime scene…

It is not clear what the officers thought they were doing at that point. In a report filed later that day, one officer wrote, “Detectives believed another person was inside the house refusing to exit. Supposedly they saw movement in the house.” Another wrote, “There may be three people still inside the residence and all were possibly armed.”

There was no one in the house. Christopher Torres’ body was in the back yard. Shot in the back, point blank, three times. He was dead.

The lies the police told have been contradicted by an eye witness.

Albuquerque TV stations, print media journalists, make a big deal about courageous investigative journalism. Most of it is laughable, useless, cow country comedy. Rachel Aviv – for the NewYorker – knows what she is doing. This is a masterful piece of writing. Detail included you never get in TV news-bites; but, nothing extraneous. Worthy of a Pulitzer Prize.

Mike, one of our regulars, emailed me the link. I sat and read it it and decided I wanted to hold off on posting it till the weekend. This is not something you dash through on your coffee break at work. Read it and reflect.

Albuquerque politicians are stuck into spin and denial. Their sell to the public, after all, is we’re Republicans, we’re going to solve these problems. Trouble is – they weren’t the ones to contact the Department of Justice and ask for an investigation into police killings. Were they, now?

It ain’t just Albuquerque’s problem – it’s America’s problem.

Here are links to the Rolling Stone article on the shooting of James Boyd and a Washington POST article on the Albuquerque PD’s response, their treatment of the DA who dared to indict a couple of their cops for murder.