Commercial directors making today’s coolest adverts

The whole commercial makes no mention of brand or models excepting the tiny-print identifiers appearing for a second or two. If you’re in the market for something like this – you already know what you’re looking at!

This is from the Portland, Oregon, crew at Wieden+Kennedy

Wayne McClammy, Hungry Man

McClammy credits meeting Emilio Estevez with kick-starting his career (“If Emilio can direct, I can direct,” he thought), and soon he was making viral comedy hits, many for Jimmy Kimmel. (His short “I’m Fucking Matt Damon,” with Sarah Silverman, notably won an Emmy.) His star-studded reel showcases this broader gift for comedy. Case in point: a growing list of credits for Geico and The Martin Agency that includes the instant goofy-camel classic “Hump Day.”

“Hump Day” alone makes him a star in my skies.

Click here for nine more insane in the membrane-directors leading the world of commercial advertising.

Pic of the Day

Black cop aids shithead
Click to enlargeAP/Rob Godfrey

South Carolina’s director of public safety, Leroy Smith, helps a man wearing a Nazi t-shirt up the stairs at a KKK white supremacist rally after it appeared he was suffering from heat exhaustion

Leroy Smith, the first Black man hired as Director of Public Safety in South Carlina – a former Florida state trooper – was not above helping an unidentified protester showing signs of heat exhaustion while wearing a black, swastika-blazoned T-shirt. A solid by-the-book cop doing his job with grace and care – even though he’s come to the aid of a miserable low-life racist who believes that Black folks like Leroy Smith should not have the right to vote or hold the job he has.

Gotta love it.

FDA proposes labels listing added sugars — finally

The Food and Drug Administration has proposed that nutrition labels on packaged foods cite the amount of added sugars they contain as a percentage of the recommended daily calorie intake.

The proposal brought immediate criticism from manufacturers of foods and beverages, which claimed blah, blah, blah.

Added sugars are those not found in foods before they are produced and packaged. Federal officials recommend that Americans limit added sugars to just 10 percent of their daily calories.

Last year, for the first time, the F.D.A. proposed that companies list added sugars on nutrition labels, but consumers would have had to do the math themselves to determine the percentage of calories. Under the new proposal, nutritional labels would lay out that figure.

Agency officials determined that 50 grams of added sugars should be the upper dietary limit, or daily value, for adults and children aged 4 and older.

That means “one 16-ounce soda, and that’s it for added sugars for the day,” said Marion Nestle, a professor of nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University…

The industry is especially upset over their most recent survey which indicated that consumers would be less likely to buy a product if its nutrition panel listed added sugars.

NSS.