US-born, having to sue Texas for denying birth certificates

Juana, a 33-year-old mother of three, works as a kale picker on the U.S.-Mexico border near McAllen, Texas, where she shares a one-bedroom trailer with her children. She was born in Mexico, and her uncle helped her to cross into Texas when she was 14 years old.

“I’ve been here practically half my life,” said Juana, who did not want to reveal her last name because she is undocumented. “I pay taxes. I’ve never depended on the government.”

Her children, born the Texas side of the border, are U.S. citizens. But when she went to the local vital statistics office earlier this year to get a copy of her youngest daughter’s birth certificate, she was turned away for lack of proper identification. Her child, who was born in November 2013, still does not have a birth certificate…

Juana is among 28 undocumented immigrants who are suing the Texas Department of State Health Services on behalf of their U.S.-born children for denying them their birth certificates. The suit was filed in May and was amended on Tuesday to include more plaintiffs.

The lawsuit comes as 2016 presidential candidates engaged in bitter debates about the fate of an estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. Some 26 U.S. states filed a lawsuit attempting to block the White House’s plan to protect about 5 million undocumented immigrants from deportation.

The 14th Amendment states that all people born in the U.S. are citizens. But in the immigrants’ lawsuit, the two civil rights groups suing the state on the immigrants’ behalf say the department is violating the law by refusing to recognize the matrícula consular — an ID card issued by Mexican consulates — as a valid form of identification.

Parents must present a birth certificate to enroll a child in school or day care, apply for benefits or even to have a child baptized.

Because undocumented immigrants, many of them from Mexico and Central America, do not have a required form of ID like a green card or work authorization papers, they are required to show two secondary forms of identification to get a child’s birth certificate. Often that includes the matrícula consular. But Texas in 2008 announced a new policy of rejecting matrículas, citing security concerns. The measure went largely unenforced until 2013…

Juana, for her part, did not encounter problems presenting her matrícula along with hospital records to obtain birth certificates for her two older children, who are 13 and 8 years old. But obtaining a birth certificate for her youngest child has proved challenging…

She should have the same rights as a child born to American parents,” she said.

Republican-controlled states are in a race to the bottom of the scumbag barrel. True, violating constitutional rights is nothing new for the cretins who pass for today’s version of a conservative; but, rarely has there been such an array of lies and bureaucratic hypocrisy passed off as legitimate.

On one hand, it is hilarious to see rightwing populists spend half their time whining about government interference in daily life – and the other half inventing new ways for governments to interfere with the daily lives of Americans who ain’t the right color, right religion, or just plain rightwing enough to satisfy turdbrains.

On the other, there’s nothing new or even faintly grinworthy about stupid people wasting local taxpayer dollar$ to enforce their bigotry upon legitimate citizens of this nation.

Capturing the beauty of California’s wildfires


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Thanks to California’s historic four-year drought, some specialists are now referring to frequent wildfires as a “new normal” for the state. For the past two years, Los Angeles-based photographer Stuart Palley has been chasing these flare-ups to capture their unusual beauty.

“The fires move fast and you need to get there on the first night of the fire to capture its most intense behavior,” Palley told Quartz. “Two years ago I left my own birthday party early to go photograph a fire.”

Taken with a long-exposure or under a starry night sky, the 27-year-old’s shots of flames and smoke engulfing hills, forests, roads and homes are hair-raisingly gorgeous.

Some of the most dangerous moments in nature may also be beautiful. One more tightrope for a serious photographer.

Drunken low-speed chase + stolen backhoe = 18 months in jail


Getaway vehicle

An Alberta man has been sentenced to 18 months in jail after leading police on a drunken low-speed chase on a stolen backhoe along the Trans-Canada Highway, near Fredericton, last month.

Thomas Therrien Chiasson, 27, had previously changed his plea to guilty on seven charges, including dangerous driving and impaired driving…

The Crown prosecutor had recommended the 18-month sentence for Chiasson, who struggled to contain his laughter as the details of the case were relayed to the court.

The 10 km/h chase took place on the Trans-Canada Highway, about 25 kilometres west of Fredericton, at around 3:40 a.m. on July 7.

It ended near King’s Landing after RCMP officers put down a spike belt, with assistance from members of the Fredericton Police Force.

The backhoe caused more than $23,000 in damage to the highway guardrail and to the asphalt, the courtroom heard.

Chiasson’s defence lawyer agreed the recommended sentence was appropriate.

And dumb enough to sit there in court chuckling over the chase. How to impress a judge.