Sugar vs corn syrup = both “natural” enough to kill you in mass quantities

Corn refiners cannot “make stuff up” and claim that high fructose corn syrup is the same as sugar, an attorney for big sugar processors said in court on Wednesday.

Lawyers delivered opening statements in a trial pitting sugar processors against major corn refiners including Archer Daniels Midland and Cargill… The billion-dollar lawsuit could shape how consumers view two bitter foes in a deteriorating U.S. sweetener market.

Several sugar refiners including global leader ASR Group sued in 2011, alleging that a corn trade group’s ad campaign describing high fructose corn syrup as “corn sugar” and “natural” was false. The corn refiners countersued, saying the Sugar Association falsely claimed in its newsletter that corn syrup causes obesity and cancer.

The case comes amid a decline in sweetener demand. The U.S. slowdown is due in part to concerns about high rates of obesity and diabetes…

In 1999, the average American consumed 85.3 lb of corn sweeteners per year, compared with 66.4 lb of sugar, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture data. However, by 2014 corn sweetener consumption had dropped to 60.7 lb, while sugar consumption stood at 68.4 lb.

Overall, the average American consumed 131.1 lb of sweetener in 2014, down from 153.2 lb in 1999

Any responsible doctor, any modern nutritionist will survey your diet and tell you to get rid of most of the sugar – whether it’s fructose or sucrose. At least if you eat the crap our TV Talking Heads, contrived family magazines, most versions of what passes for media news-as-entertainment are paid to recommend.

Take the time to read up on discussions between professional nutritionists. Try the Mayo Clinic. You not only might live a bit longer, you may enjoy it better.

4 thoughts on “Sugar vs corn syrup = both “natural” enough to kill you in mass quantities

  1. Sweetie Pie says:

    Bud Light attacked rival brands in its Super Bowl ads, but it was the corn industry that felt stung.
    The spots trolled rival brands that use corn syrup. One showed a medieval caravan schlepping a huge barrel of corn syrup to castles owned by Miller and Coors.
    The National Corn Growers Association rebuked the brand for boasting that Bud Light does not use the ingredient.
    The association, which says it represents 40,000 corn farmers nationwide, tweeted that America’s corn farmers were “disappointed” in Bud Light, and thanked Miller Lite and Coors Light for “supporting our industry.”

    • Oyez Oyez says:

      A Wisconsin judge on Friday ordered Anheuser-Busch to stop suggesting in advertising that MillerCoors’ light beers contain corn syrup, wading into a fight between two beer giants that are losing market share to small independent brewers.
      U.S. District Judge William Conley for the Western District of Wisconsin granted a preliminary injunction sought by MillerCoors that temporarily stops Anheuser-Busch from using the words “corn syrup” in ads without giving more context.
      MillerCoors sued its rival in March, saying St. Louis-based Anheuser-Busch has spent as much as $30 million on a “false and misleading” campaign, including $13 million in its first commercials during this year’s Super Bowl. https://www.shootonline.com/newsbriefs/judge-anheuser-busch-must-revise-ads-aimed-millercoors

  2. Colorectal Cola says:

    “High-fructose corn syrup boosts intestinal tumor growth in mice” (Baylor College of Medicine 3/21/19) https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-03/bcom-hcs031819.php “Does sugar directly feed cancers, boosting their growth? The answer seems to be ‘Yes’ at least in mice according to a study led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Weill Cornell Medicine. Their study, published in Science, showed that consuming a daily modest amount of high-fructose corn syrup – the equivalent of people drinking about 12 ounces of a sugar-sweetened beverage daily – accelerates the growth of intestinal tumors in mouse models of the disease, independently of obesity. The team also discovered the mechanism by which the consumption of sugary drinks can directly feed cancer growth, suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies.”

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