Line freeways with wind turbines: [1] highways are ugly and [2] no one lives there anyway


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Britain’s motorways should be lined with wind turbines because they are already unattractive and very few people live alongside them, according to Baroness Brown, the UK’s green energy ambassador.

Wind farms built along the 2,300-mile motorway network would generate less local opposition than those constructed in unspoiled rural areas, predicted Baroness Brown, an independent peer in the House of Lords.

“You don’t really want to live beside a motorway – it’s not good for you and it’s noisy. I do a lot of driving up the east side of the country and I wonder why we don’t line the sides of our motorways with wind turbines…

“We haven’t got infinite space and you have got to be sensitive about where you put these things. But motorways seem like an ideal location…”

Seems like a good idea here in the US, as well. Think they’d spoil the view driving through Secaucus on the New Jersey Turnpike?

The cost of onshore wind power has plummeted in recent years and is now the cheapest of all electricity sources. But the Government has made it difficult for new onshore windfarms to be built despite them offering the best way to meet ambitious climate targets in an affordable way.

Many stretches of motorway are not windy enough to power turbines, experts warn. But other parts of the motorway network provide plenty of scope for wind farms, they say, such as the 152-turbine Clyde array on either side of the M74 near the Lanarkshire village of Abington and the 11-turbine Swinford complex by the M1 in Leicestershire. The turbines on windfarms such as these have to be set back from the motorway so they don’t fall on to it if they keel over.

Hopefully, the Brits – and other folks – are capable of erecting wind turbines that don’t fall over onto freeways. Unlike our out-of-repair bridges.

5 thoughts on “Line freeways with wind turbines: [1] highways are ugly and [2] no one lives there anyway

  1. Ursa says:

    One proposal in the USA is to add vertical turbines to the electric towers already lining our highways: less expensive, utilizing the current power structures.

  2. Meanwhile says:

    “Sandia National Labs has unveiled the preliminary design for a new offshore wind turbine with 650-foot turbine blades. That, as its announcement points out, is twice the size of an American football field.” https://share.sandia.gov/news/resources/news_releases/big_blades/#.Vqz7j1K2hRm Last year, Sandia was granted nearly $4 million by ARPA-E, the US Department of Energy’s blue sky alternative energy research wing, to design and test the concept. “The 50 MW turbine design could enable a 10x increase in power compared to today’s largest production turbines,” ARPA-E said in its 2015 funding announcement. “The hurricane-resistant design can enable low-cost, off-shore wind energy for the United States.”

  3. 嘲笑 says:

    Chinese Wind Turbine Maker Is Now World’s Largest http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/chinese-wind-turbine-maker-is-now-world-s-largest/ General Electric Co. has ceded its position as the world’s No. 1 wind turbine manufacturer to a Chinese competitor, according to 2015 market data compiled by Bloomberg New Energy Finance.
    Xinjiang Goldwind Science & Technology Co. Ltd. received orders for 7.8 gigawatts of new wind turbines in 2015, exceeding GE, which dropped to No. 3 globally with 5.9 GW of new commissioned capacity, according to BNEF. Vestas Wind Systems A/S of Denmark attracted 7.3 GW of new orders in 2015, solidifying its No. 2 ranking in the global supply chain.

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