North Carolina coppers bust man for not returning VHS rental 14 years ago


James Meyers

A Concord, NC, man was arrested for failing to return a 2002 VHS rental movie, “Freddy Got Fingered.”

James Meyers showed Channel 9 the arrest warrant Wednesday. It shows Meyers is charged with failure to return rental property, a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up to $200. The charge had not been dismissed as of Wednesday afternoon.

The story of Meyers’ arrest has since gone viral after Eyewitness News broke the news late Wednesday night.

The rental store in Salisbury, J&J’s Video, has since closed, but Meyers was still given an April 27 court date for failing to return the gross-out comedy about a cartoonist returning home to live with his parents.

Meyers said he was driving his daughter to school on Concord Parkway Tuesday morning when a Concord police officer pulled him over for a tail-light that was out.

Meyers said the officer ran his license and approximately 25 minutes later asked him to step out of the vehicle.

“The officer said, ‘I don’t know how to tell you this but there’s a warrant out for your arrest from 2002. Apparently you rented the movie “Freddy Got Fingered” and never returned it.’

I thought he was joking,” said Meyers…

Meyers said he thought everything would get straightened out at the department. He was surprised when officers arrested him and then took him to the magistrate’s office.

“…first time I got put in handcuffs,” said Meyers.

No, this is not the first time this has happened in North Carolina. Does anyone expect a state notorious for jerkwater politics to have cops and judges that function like it’s the 21st Century.

The essential rules of computerized systems hasn’t changed. Garbage in = garbage out. It stays the same whether dealing with voting rights or VHS rentals. 19th Century minds produce 19th Century policies.

Pic of the day


Attack of the Giant Tinned Calamares — Click to enlarge — Tom Janssen

From a collection of Tom Janssen photos of unusual processions and parades in the Netherlands.

Calamari is near and dear to my heart and appetite in spring. Traditional in many springtime festival meals, my favorite is serving chunks and slice of squid in a garlicky tomato sauce. Often with just a little bit too much black pepper for everyone else sharing the meal.

Arch Coal stuffed $8 million into the pockets of execs the day before bankruptcy


Ex-Governor Freudenthal sold his shares in Arch just before bankruptcy

Arch Coal paid its top executives more than $8 million in bonuses the business day before the company filed for bankruptcy in January, according to U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Missouri filings published last week.

Securities and Exchange Commission records also show that 12 company insiders exercised or converted about 88,000 “phantom stocks”…worth more than $70,000 that same Friday, Jan. 8, 2016.

On the following Monday, Jan. 11, Arch announced it had filed for bankruptcy protection…

The most notable transactions Arch made in the days before filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, according to court and SEC filings, were payments of $8.12 million in bonuses to seven of its corporate officers, including its CEO, Chief Financial Officer and president…

Gary Hufbauer, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, said the bonus payments “could be very likely voided by a bankruptcy court.”

Bankruptcy courts scrutinize a company’s financial transactions and payments made during the 90 days before that firm filed for protection. Hufbauer called the $8.12 million on the eve of bankruptcy “really suspicious…”

Of the 12 insiders named in transactions with phantom stock, 10 were board members and the remaining two were Drexler, the CFO, and Cochran, senior vice president of operations…a form filed Jan. 12 but dated four days before lists David Freudenthal, the former Democratic governor of Wyoming, and shows that 2,757 shares worth $2,288.31 were disposed of.

“It seems strange that you would have such a coincidence,” said Thaya Brook Knight, associate director of financial regulation studies at the Cato Institute, referring to the short window between the Friday transactions and the Monday morning bankruptcy declaration.

Court documents also show Arch made two other payments on the business day before it sought bankruptcy protection.

One was a $12,540 payment to the Algonquin Golf Club in St. Louis, where the firm is headquartered, and the other a $10,680 payment to the Bellerive Country Club, also in St. Louis.

Hey, these captains of industry have to use up some of that free time they now have – since the company they guided through the seas of American commerce has sunk. Playing golf will at least keep them walking around in the fresh air.