Geologists reach rock layer in crater of dinosaur-killing asteroid


Click to enlargeBBCMundo.com

Geophysicists announced this week that they have successfully collected key samples from the site of the asteroid strike that likely wiped out the dinosaurs.

Scientists have had a literal breakthrough off the coast of Mexico…After weeks of drilling from an offshore platform in the Gulf of Mexico, they have reached rocks left over from the day the Earth was hit by a killer asteroid.

The cataclysm is believed to have wiped out the dinosaurs. “This was probably the most important event in the last 100 million years,” says Joanna Morgan, a geophysicist at Imperial College in London and a leader of the expedition.

Since the 1980s, researchers have known about the impact site, located near the present-day Yucatan Peninsula. Known as Chicxulub, the crater is approximately 125 miles across. It was created when an asteroid the size of Staten Island, N.Y., struck Earth around 66 million years ago. The initial explosion from the impact would have made a nuclear bomb look like a firecracker. The searing heat started wildfires many hundreds of miles away.

After that, came an unscheduled winter. Sulfur, ash and debris clouded the sky. Darkness fell and, for a while, Earth was not itself…

Scientists believe 75 percent of life went extinct during this dark chapter in Earth’s history, including the dinosaurs.

Researchers have sampled Chicxulub before, but this expedition…targets a key part of the crater yet to be studied: a ring of mountains left by the asteroid. This “peak ring” is a fundamental feature of the strike and should tell researchers much more about it, says Sean Gulick, a geophysicist at the University of Texas at Austin, who co-leads the team with Morgan.

For weeks, they’ve been drilling — and going back in time. Each layer of rock they pass through is connected to a part of Earth’s history…

The rocks they’ve pulled out show how life began to recover after the cataclysm, Gulick says. “We’ve got all these limestones and rocks that contain the fossils from the world after the impact, all the things that evolved from the few organisms that survived.”

The research team finally reached the top of the peak ring this week. It appears to be a thick layer of broken, melted rock just beneath a layer of sandstone that may be the leavings of a huge tsunami that was triggered when the asteroid struck.

Gulick thinks the rocks hold clues. For example, if any microscopic organisms survived near the site of the strike, their fossils might be in these samples. In June, the rock cores will be sent back to a lab in Germany for further study.

The asteroid strike marked the end of an era. But the creatures that made it through that catastrophe went on to shape the world again, says Morgan.

“The mammals survived,” she says. “And that led on to our own evolution.”

Some folks might feel what came after the disaster was at least as important as the impact event itself. I’m not so confident. After all, the predominant species may yet complete the destruction of the whole planet.

5 thoughts on “Geologists reach rock layer in crater of dinosaur-killing asteroid

  1. DON"T PANIC! says:

    NASA’s New ‘Intruder Alert’ System Spots An Incoming Asteroid (10/30/16) http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/10/30/499751470/nasas-new-intruder-alert-system-spots-an-incoming-asteroid Thanks to a new tool NASA is developing for detecting potentially dangerous asteroids it has been determined that MPEC 2016-U84 : 2016 UR36, which is estimated to be 5 to 25 meters across, will miss the earth tonight by approximately 310,000 miles. (on average we’re 238,855 miles from our moon). “Here, for whatever reason, is the world. And here it stays. With me on it.” Douglas Adams, “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy”

  2. La morte viene dallo spazio says:

    “Asteroid strike made ‘instant Himalayas'” http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38019604 “Scientists say they can now describe in detail how the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs produced its huge crater. The reconstruction of the event 66 million years ago was made possible by drilling into the remnant bowl and analyzing its rocks.” The researchers report their account in this week’s edition of Science Magazine. Video: animation shows the action in one half of the crater.

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