Thousands protest US bases on Okinawa — murder provokes increased anger over subservience to US military


Click to enlargeAssociated Press

Tens of thousands of people on the Japanese island of Okinawa have taken part in one of the biggest protests against US military bases in recent years, weeks after the arrest of an American base worker in connection with the murder of a 20-year-old local woman.

The protesters, many of whom wore black, braved scorching heat to call for an end to the island’s role as host to more than half the 47,000 US troops in Japan…

The protesters also urged the Japanese and US governments to abandon the controversial relocation of a marine airbase from a crowded city on Okinawa to a more remote coastal location on the island, about 1,000 miles south of Tokyo.

They just want the American military gone!

Okinawa’s anti-base governor, Takeshi Onaga, told the crowd he regretted being powerless to prevent crimes by US military personnel, two decades after the abduction and rape of a 12-year-old girl by three US servicemen.

That crime prompted mass protests and forced Tokyo and Washington to discuss reductions in the US military footprint on Okinawa, including the relocation of Futenma to a district in the coastal town of Nago, and the transfer of 8,000 marines and their dependents to the US Pacific territory of Guam and other locations.

…Onaga said…“The government … must understand that Okinawa residents should not suffer any more from the burden of the bases.”…

Okinawa was the scene of one of the bloodiest battles of the Pacific war, and remained under American occupation until 1972. About a fifth of the island is still under US military control.

Previous Japanese governments with more independence than Shinzo Abe’s actually tried to have the bases removed from Okinawa. They received messages from both George W Bush and Obama reminding them of officially secret treaties signed with the United States as part of Japan’s surrender at the end of World War 2 – giving the US control over Japanese territory essentially forever.

Hackers invited to check for security failures in a few Pentagon websites — only found 138!

High-tech hackers brought in by the Pentagon to breach Defense Department websites were able to burrow in and find 138 different security gaps…

The so-called white-hat hackers were turned loose on five public Pentagon internet pages and were offered various bounties if they could find unique vulnerabilities. The Pentagon says 1,410 hackers participated in the challenge and the first gap was identified just 13 minutes after the hunt began.

Overall, they found 1,189 vulnerabilities, but a review by the Pentagon determined that only 138 were valid and unique.

The experiment cost $150,000. Of that, about half was paid out to the hackers as bounties, including one who received the maximum prize of $15,000 for submitting a number of security gaps. Others received varying amounts, to as low as $100.

“These are ones we weren’t aware of, and now we have the opportunity to fix them. And again, it’s a lot better than either hiring somebody to do that for you, or finding out the hard way,” said Defense Secretary Ash Carter…

Called “Hack the Pentagon,” the program will be followed by a series of initiatives, including a process that will allow anyone who finds a security gap in Defense Department systems to report it without fear of prosecution. The department will also expand the bounty program to the military services and encourage contractors to allow similar scrutiny.

Which is why beta-testing is always needed. No matter the skill of code-designers, software engineers, product has to be opened to testing in a wider arena than anything available in-house. And, then – pay attention to what happens after that.

Always something to be discovered. Hopefully, by someone wearing a white hat.

43% of foods aimed at children contain artificial dyes

In an effort to appeal to picky young palates, food processors often make their products more tempting by putting color in the food. A recent study has shown, though, that 43% of foods marketed to children contain artificial food colors…

According to researchers…the food most likely to contain artificial dyes is — no surprise — candy, with 96.3% of the brands sampled containing artificial dyes. Next on the list were fruit-flavored snacks (94.7%); drink mixes and powders (89.7%); and frozen breakfasts (85.7%).

At the other end of the scale were produce (0%); cheese, yogurt and milk products (12%); ice cream and cones (16%); and packaged pasta and soups (19%)…

Researchers surveyed grocery stores and found 810 products that were marketed to children. Other foods that aren’t specifically marketed to children, such as soda pop, were not included in the survey.

Kraft Foods was the leader in using AFCs, with 105 of that company’s line using the dyes, amounting to 65.7% of their products. Kellogg was next at 69 products, followed by General Mills with 67.

The most popular AFC used by food processors was Red 40, followed by Blue 1 and Yellow 5.

Just in case you wished to coordinate your kids’ finger-painting with the crap palette used on foods aimed at their young lives.

Who are we?

“We find that we live on an insignificant planet of a humdrum star lost in a galaxy tucked away in some forgotten corner of a universe in which there are far more galaxies than people.” — Carl Sagan

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Click to enlargeImage/NASA

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station see the world at night on every orbit — that’s 16 times each crew day. An astronaut took this broad, short-lens photograph of Earth’s night lights while looking out over the remote reaches of the central equatorial Pacific Ocean. ISS was passing over the island nation of Kiribati at the time, about 2600 kilometers south of Hawaii.

Thanks, Ursarodinia