Brexit from Euro 2016: England 1 – 2 Iceland


Click to enlargeBrynjar Gunnarsson, AP

A few folks gathered to watch on TV back in Iceland — and celebrate

England crashed out of Euro 2016 after a shock 2-1 defeat to Iceland, and the tiny country of just 330,000 sealed a quarterfinal date with France on July 3 in Saint-Denis.

Iceland, in their first major tournament, fielded the same side for the fourth straight game, while England made six changes, including Raheem Sterling in for Adam Lallana.

Uncle Roy still in love with Harry Kane didn’t play Vardy till the 2nd half – and no plan to focus on the Leicester winner.

Hodgson’s final roll of the dice came when 18-year-old Marcus Rashford made his bow in the 86th minute for Manchester United teammate Rooney. However, the youngster could do nothing about the score line. Vardy’s late header flashed wide and England crashed out as Iceland progressed to the quarterfinals to meet France.

RTFA for play throughout the match. It was mediocrity at its traditional tournament best. Roy Hodgson resigned after the match.

Iceland played their hearts out – like a team.

Agnotology — Huh? Wha?

Fascinating discussion via Wired‘s Clive Thompson, and Stanford historian of science Robert Proctor, on Agnotology:

“When it comes to many contentious subjects, our usual relationship to information is reversed: Ignorance increases.

[Proctor] has developed a word inspired by this trend: agnotology. Derived from the Greek root agnosis, it is “the study of culturally constructed ignorance.”

As Proctor argues, when society doesn’t know something, it’s often because special interests work hard to create confusion. Anti-Obama groups likely spent millions insisting he’s a Muslim; church groups have shelled out even more pushing creationism. The oil and auto industries carefully seed doubt about the causes of global warming. And when the dust settles, society knows less than it did before.

“People always assume that if someone doesn’t know something, it’s because they haven’t paid attention or haven’t yet figured it out,” Proctor says. “But ignorance also comes from people literally suppressing truth—or drowning it out—or trying to make it so confusing that people stop caring about what’s true and what’s not.” (emphasis added)

Fairly amazing, and when it comes to certain issues, it’s dead on.

What an awesome definition:

Agnotology: Culturally constructed ignorance, purposefully created by special interest groups working hard to create confusion and suppress the truth.

Most often I’d go straight to the source[s]; but, give credit where due. Though I often comb through WIRED, I check in with Barry Ritholtz’s TWITTER feed a few times every day. Which is where I found these links.

Thanks, Barry Ritholtz

Japanese electric utility admits to coverup during Fukushima nuclear meltdown


Warning sign on the road to Fukushima

The utility that ran the Fukushima nuclear plant acknowledged Tuesday its delayed disclosure of the meltdowns at three reactors was tantamount to a coverup and apologized for it.

Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) president Naomi Hirose’s apology followed the revelation last week that an investigation had found Hirose’s predecessor instructed officials during the 2011 disaster to avoid using the word “meltdown.”

I would say it was a coverup,” Hirose told a news conference. “It’s extremely regrettable.”…

And it only took five years and information released in an investigation to prompt a moment of honesty.

TEPCO instead described the reactors’ condition as less serious “core damage” for two months after the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, wrecked the plant, even though utility officials knew and computer simulations suggested meltdowns had occurred.

An investigative report released last Thursday by three company-appointed lawyers said TEPCO’s then-President Masataka Shimizu instructed officials not to use the specific description under alleged pressure from the Prime Minister’s Office, though the investigators found no proof of such pressure.

The report said TEPCO officials, who had suggested possible meltdowns, stopped using the description after March 14, 2011…Shimizu had a company official show Muto his memo and tell him the Prime Minister’s Office has banned the specific words.

Government officials also softened their language on the reactor conditions around the same time, the report said…Former officials at the Prime Minister’s Office have denied the allegation…

Deny, deny, deny. Political hacks, corporate hacks, still rely on the Big Lie to cover their tracks. If you do a crappy job at preserving the safety of ordinary citizens, you lie and deny – unless you can find someone else to blame.