Any good reasons why Florida hasn’t allowed in the CDC’s emergency response team to fight Zika?


Reuters/Paulo Whitaker/file photo

The state of Florida, the first to report the arrival of Zika in the continental United States, has yet to invite a dedicated team of the federal government’s disease hunters to assist with the investigation on the ground, health officials told Reuters.

Coordination with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention since the state reported possible local Zika transmission on July 19 has been conducted largely at a distance, they said. That is surprising to some infectious disease experts, who say a less robust response could lead to a higher number of infections.

While Florida has a strong record of battling limited outbreaks of similar mosquito-borne viruses, including dengue and chikungunya, the risk of birth defects caused by Zika adds greater urgency to containing its spread with every available means, they say. Other states have quickly called in CDC teams to help track high-profile diseases.

You only have a small window. This is the window” to prevent a small-scale outbreak from spreading, said Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine…who expressed impatience with the pace of the Florida investigation.

Florida on Friday said that four cases of Zika in the state were likely caused by mosquito, the first sign that the virus is circulating locally, though it has yet to identify mosquitoes carrying the disease.

Florida Governor Rick Scott said the state health department was working with the CDC as it continues its Zika investigation…Dr Marc Fischer, a CDC epidemiologist, has gone to Florida at the state’s request.

But the state has not invited in the CDC’s wider emergency response team of experts in epidemiology, risk communication, vector control and logistics…

CDC spokesman Tom Skinner said the agency has several teams ready for when states request help with Zika, including Florida…

“Florida does what Florida does,” said one public health expert familiar with the investigation. “If I were health commissioner, I would have asked for their (CDC’s) help immediately.”

Still Floriduh, ain’t it. Even more so with Rick Scott in charge.

3 thoughts on “Any good reasons why Florida hasn’t allowed in the CDC’s emergency response team to fight Zika?

  1. Gorgas says:

    (8/1/16) After 10 more cases of Zika virus were confirmed in Florida, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a travel recommendation that pregnant women do not go to the one-square-mile patch north of Miami’s downtown where the cases were detected.
    The CDC also said that women who have been in the area should wait at least eight weeks before trying for a pregnancy. http://qz.com/747418/the-cdc-has-issued-a-travel-advisory-for-a-zika-virus-stricken-area-of-miami/ Florida’s governor, Rick Scott, continues to deny that Florida may be unsafe for tourists due to the outbreak. Both the British and Canadian governments are already urging pregnant women traveling to Florida to postpone their trips.

    • Hot Zone says:

      This is the first time the CDC has ever issued a warning in the continental U.S. due to an infectious disease. This news comes during Congress’ seven-week summer vacation and five months after President Obama requested $1.9 billion in funds to fight Zika. For months, House Republicans dragged their feet on approving the funding and—surprising no one—once House and Senate Republicans agreed on funding, the package contained so many partisan provisions Democrats couldn’t get on board. Late last week, a group of congressional Democrats called for Congress to end recess early to pass the bill, but so far nothing’s happened. Meanwhile the U.S Department of Health and Human Services’ has just allocated $42.3 million in what was once funding to battle Ebola toward the pressing Zika fight. http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hhs-allocates-423-million-reprogrammed-ebola-funds-zika-fight

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