4-foot-long Titanosaur footprints found in the Gobi desert


Professor Shinobu Ishigaki lies next to the footprintAFP/Getty Images

One of the largest ever dinosaur footprints has been found by a joint expedition of Japanese and Mongolian researchers in the Gobi desert.

The giant print measures 106cm (42in) long and 77cm (30in) wide, according to AFP. It is thought to have belonged to a titanosaur, a group of giant, long-necked herbivores. Researchers said the creature may have been more than 30 meters (98ft) long and 20 meters (66ft) tall.

The print was discovered in August in a geologic layer formed between 70 million and 90 million years ago by researchers from Okayama University of Science and the Mongolian Academy of Science…

The print is a cast from sand that flowed into dents left by the creature’s enormous footprint. Its discovery could help scientists understand how titanosaurs walked.

In 2014, a titanosaur skeleton was discovered in Argentina and was dubbed the largest dinosaur ever discovered. A replica of the dinosaur, which has yet to be named, is currently on display at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. It weighed about 70 tons and its skeleton is 37 meters (122ft) long.

I would love to be convinced of the possibility of viewing prehistoric times via some sort of time warp. Scientists would line up for primary source accuracy.

Do Not Resist!

Craig Atkinson’s documentary about police militarization, Do Not Resist, is filled with unsettling scenes like the one where a Swat team destroys a family’s home during a drug raid that nets small amounts of loose marijuana. But the most disturbing scene transpires during the relative placidity of a seminar when a hugely successful lecturer tells a room full of police officers: “We are at war and you are the frontline.

“What do you fight violence with? Superior violence. Righteous violence. Violence is your tool … You are men and women of violence.”

The speaker, Dave Grossman, is a retired army lieutenant colonel with a packed national speaking schedule. In the film, Grossman also promulgates the notion that one perk of violent encounters is that police often say that afterwards they have the best sex of their lives, which Atkinson, in an interview, sees as parallel to promising virgins to a suicide bomber.

Been part of my whole life, folks. Decades stepping forward from a factory town in New England, through every day of the civil rights movement, opposition to imperial war, confronting the greedy bastards who always, always, place profits before people.

Don’t get used to it. Hate it. Condemn it. Fight with every fiber of your being against those who are willing and ready to use a police state to shut down our freedom to think, to speak.