Business leaders don’t want Dodo bird decisions – ask Trump to support Paris climate pact


Trump transition team

❝ More than 360 businesses and investors called on U.S. President-elect Donald Trump and world leaders on Wednesday to continue to support agreed curbs on global warming and to speed up efforts to move to a low-carbon economy.

In a statement addressed to Trump, U.S. President Barack Obama, members of the U.S. Congress and global leaders, the group, called 360+, reaffirmed its commitment to the Paris Agreement on climate change.

❝ The 360+ group includes companies such as DuPont, Gap, General Mills, Hewlett Packard, Hilton, Kellogg, Levi Strauss, L’Oreal USA, Nike, Mars Incorporated, Schneider Electric, Starbucks and Unilever.

❝ The Paris Agreement, aiming to phase out net greenhouse gas emissions this century, came into force on Nov. 4 and now has backing from 110 nations including the United States…

Trump has threatened to tear up the U.S. commitment to the accord.

❝ The 360+ group called on U.S. leaders to continue to participate in the Paris Agreement, support the continuation of U.S. commitments on climate change and continue to invest in low-carbon solutions at home and abroad.

Failure to build a low-carbon economy puts American prosperity at risk. But the right action now will create jobs and boost U.S. competitiveness,” the group said

Making ideological decisions on matters of science and environment is pretty much inexcusable. There are comparable parallels in history. None of them ever ended well for humanity.

Santa Fe stands firm as a sanctuary city


Javier Gonzales

❝ Less than a week after Donald Trump won the election for president of the United States, the mayor of New Mexico’s capital city is not backing down from so-called “sanctuary” status.

This comes despite threats to cut federal money to such cities made by the president-elect during the campaign.

“The threat is intended to divide us against each other,” Santa Fe Mayor Javier Gonzales wrote in a statement on Twitter Monday afternoon. “It is one of the first, but it won’t be the last we see out of this administration, which based on its own words intends to persecute and attack not only immigrants but women, Muslims, people of color, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, and more.”

❝ Though there is no formal legal definition, the politically charged term “sanctuary city” typically refers to cities that limit cooperation with the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency on immigration policies.

Santa Fe, for example, bars the use of public resources to check for someone’s immigration status. That means city police are not supposed to check the immigration status of someone they arrest…

❝ Gonzales also vowed to fight in court should a Trump administration follow through with this promise.

“We don’t relish having to re-litigate issues which we hoped were long-settled, but we won’t hesitate to rise to the occasion when we must,” Gonzales said…

Mayors of other “sanctuary” cities like Chicago, Minneapolis and San Francisco made similar pledges to keep their status on Monday.

Racists continue to demand all citizens assist their bigotry. Xenophobes, sexists, the whole midden heap of ideological garbage that unites Trumpkins will be set upon Americans as the religious crusade against a modern free nation escalates.

Stand firm sisters and brothers.

Obama didn’t remove the Bush “national security” policies — now, he hands them over to Trump

❝ As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump vowed to refill the cells of the Guantánamo Bay prison and said U.S. terrorism suspects should be sent there for military prosecution. He called for targeting mosques for surveillance, escalating airstrikes aimed at terrorists and taking out their civilian family members, and bringing back waterboarding and a “hell of a lot worse” — not only because “torture works,” but because even “if it doesn’t work, they deserve it anyway.”

It is hard to know how much of this stark vision for throwing off constraints on the exercise of national security power was merely tough campaign talk. But if the Trump administration follows through on such ideas, it will find some assistance in a surprising source: President Barack Obama’s have-it-both-ways approach to curbing what he saw as overreaching in the war on terrorism.

❝ Over and over, Obama has imposed limits on his use of such powers but has not closed the door on them — a flexible approach premised on the idea that he and his successors could be trusted to use them prudently. Trump can now sweep away those limits and open the throttle on policies that Obama endorsed as lawful and legitimate for sparing use, like targeted killings in drone strikes and the use of indefinite detention and military tribunals for terrorism suspects.

And even in areas where Obama tried to terminate policies from the George W. Bush era — such as torture and the detention of Americans and other people arrested on domestic soil as “enemy combatants” — his administration fought in court to prevent any ruling that the defunct practices had been illegal. The absence of a definitive repudiation could make it easier for Trump administration lawyers to revive the policies by invoking the same sweeping theories of executive power that were the basis for them in the Bush years.

RTFA and reflect upon the range of backwards tools handy to any criminal onslaught against constitutional rights, crushing dissent, reviving sedition prosecutions unheard of since the turn of the 19th Century.