USA!, USA!, becoming more diverse


Click through to the article

Farmland outside a Midwestern city turns into a bedroom enclave of commuting urban professionals. A handful of non-white people move to Dubuque, Iowa. Already diverse cities become increasingly mixed with immigrants from Asia, Africa and Latin America.

These are just some of the ways diversity is increasing in U.S. communities.

To quantify how America is changing, we used the diversity index, which measures the chance that two people chosen at random will not be the same race and ethnicity. A high score means a county has people of many races and ethnicities, while a low score means the community is made up of a single dominant group.

Click through to the article and maps. Plural. While there is an all-inclusive graphic that shunts you through a quasi-3D map, individual maps focus on each of the four trends examined.

Get used to it, folks. Trump voters probably won’t. I imagine the intellectually-curious folks who pass through here won’t have any trouble with change.

One thought on “USA!, USA!, becoming more diverse

  1. Movin' on up says:

    “This year’s election has forced Americans to take notice of class divisions between workers. And while these divisions may at first ring of lazy stereotypes — the rural Rust Belt worker without a college degree and the coastal urban college-educated worker — they’re rooted in a real dynamic. Many of the most skilled workers — young people with college degrees — are leaving struggling regions of America for cities, specifically for cities in Southern and coastal states.
    There are clear economic reasons for their choice. Dense metro areas tend to produce more jobs and make workers more productive. Wages, for all kinds of workers, are also higher.
    In theory, these incentives should prompt workers of all levels of education to move to metro areas. But moving outside one’s region is relatively rare these days, and even more rare for someone without a college degree.
    Moving is actually quite uncommon in advanced economies. The United States has been one of the exceptions. It has one of the highest rates of internal migration among advanced economies, and it has since at least the middle of the 19th century.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/22/upshot/the-states-that-college-graduates-are-most-likely-to-leave.html

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