Amazon continues retail experiments – like how to checkout with no lines

❝ Amazon.com unveiled technology that will let shoppers grab groceries without having to scan and pay for them — in one stroke eliminating the checkout line.

The company is testing the new system at what it’s calling an Amazon Go store in Seattle, which will open to the public early next year. Customers will be able to scan their phones at the entrance using a new Amazon Go mobile app. Then the technology will track what items they pick up or even return to the shelves and add them to a virtual shopping cart in real time, according a video Amazon posted on YouTube. Once the customers exit the store, they’ll be charged on their Amazon account automatically.

Amazon has been experimenting with the grocery business since 2007 when it started AmazonFresh in the Seattle area, where the company is based. The service offers doorstep delivery of a limited selection of groceries in 16 U.S. markets, including Los Angeles, New York and Boston as well as London. Amazon is also building facilities that let shoppers pull in and pick up groceries ordered online. Now the company, which already operates a few brick-and-mortar book and college-campus stores, is testing a kind of convenience store…

❝ Amazon employees are testing out the 1,800-square-foot Seattle store, where they can buy ready-to-eat breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack options as well as grocery essentials from bread and milk to artisanal cheeses and locally made chocolates. Also available: Amazon Meal Kits, containing all the ingredients needed to make a meal for two in 30 minutes…

❝ If Amazon’s plan works like as promised, the company will have succeeded in not only getting rid of the register and lines but also automating the entire buying process.

Every little bit helps. We look for self-checkout and Apple Pay wherever we shop, now. Skipping even those steps is OK by me.

2 thoughts on “Amazon continues retail experiments – like how to checkout with no lines

  1. thehonkinggoose says:

    I like the time saving aspect. But that will eliminate people’s jobs, which concerns me. Also, I have favorite checkers at the grocery stores where I shop and chatting with them is the best part of the chore.

    • eideard says:

      Doesn’t have to eliminate jobs; but, that style is always at the discretion of the owner(s). I’m surveyed often on retail experience and the stores that interest me most are those concerned with my interaction with staff. If a retailer wants to impress consumers, they’re best off if they make the shopping process seamless, quick and easy; but, part of that is easily finding someone in a green hat [or whatever] who answers a question. Even a halfway sideways question. Good checkers should be first in line to become good CSRs.

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