Bird flu found in Tennessee chicken breeder farm used by Tyson

A strain of bird flu has been detected in a chicken breeder flock on a Tennessee farm contracted to U.S. food giant Tyson Foods Inc, and the 73,500 birds will be culled to stop the virus from entering the food system…

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said this represented the first confirmed case of highly pathogenic H7 avian influenza in commercial poultry in the United States this year. It is the first time HPAI has been found in Tennessee, the state government said.

Tyson, the biggest chicken meat producer in the United States, said it was working with Tennessee and federal officials to contain the virus by euthanizing the birds on the contract farm.

In 2014 and 2015, during a widespread outbreak of HPAI, the United States killed nearly 50 million birds, mostly egg-laying hens. The losses pushed U.S. egg prices to record highs and prompted trading partners to ban imports of American poultry, even though there was little infection then in the broiler industry…

The facility in Tennessee’s Lincoln County has been placed under quarantine, along with approximately 30 other poultry farms within a 6.2-mile (10 km) radius of the site, the state said. Other flocks in the quarantined area are being tested…

The USDA said it would inform the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and international trading partners of the outbreak.

Some strains of avian flu are guaranteed dangerous to humans and might be spread by humans. Most of the strains I’ve read about this year have endangered humans contaminated by blood from birds being slaughtered. The trouble with viruses of this type is that they can mutate easily and sometimes often.

Keep an eye on the topic.

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