Patients with Drug-Resistant Malaria Cured by Simple Plant Therapy

❝ When the standard malaria medications failed to help 18 critically ill patients, the attending physician in a Congo clinic acted under the “compassionate use” doctrine and prescribed a not-yet-approved malaria therapy made only from the dried leaves of the Artemisia annua plant. In just five days, all 18 people fully recovered. This small but stunningly successful trial offers hope to address the growing problem of drug-resistant malaria…

❝ “To our knowledge, this is the first report of dried-leaf Artemisia annua controlling ACT-resistant malaria in humans,” the authors of the Phytomedicine paper note, adding that more comprehensive clinical trials on patients with drug-resistant malaria are warranted. “Successful treatment of all 18 ACT-resistant cases suggests that DLA should be rapidly incorporated into the antimalarial regimen for Africa,” they added, “and possibly wherever else ACT resistance has emerged.”…

❝ Another advantage of DLA over conventional malaria treatments is its low cost and the relative simplicity of its manufacture, Dr, Pamela Weathers said. While the processes for manufacturing ACT is costlier and requires a higher degree of expertise, producing DLA tablets can be accomplished with simpler equipment and a modest amount of training. Growing Artemisia annua and producing and testing the tablets, Weathers noted, are ideal local business that can provide jobs in impoverished areas and greatly expand access to antimalarial therapy.

That last paragraph defines an important bit of research too often left out by the Medical Industrial complex.

Thanks, Honeyman

2 thoughts on “Patients with Drug-Resistant Malaria Cured by Simple Plant Therapy

  1. Anopheles Anne says:

    “Engineered Chinese shrub produces high levels of antimalarial compound” (Cell Press 4/24/18) https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-04/cp-ecs041818.php “Artemisinin is a potent antimalarial compound produced naturally by the Chinese shrub Artemisia annua, commonly known as sweet wormwood. Currently,however, the low amount of artemisinin produced in the leaves of this plant does not meet the global demand. In a study published by April 24 in the journal Molecular Plant, researchers in China report a high-quality draft genome sequence of A. annua and their use of this information along with gene expression data to metabolically engineer plant lines that produce high levels of artemisinin. World Malaria Day is observed on April 25.

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