Chronic Brain Disease found in ~90% of brains donated by deceased football players

Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

It’s the largest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a debilitating brain disease that can cause a range of symptoms including memory loss.

The report doesn’t confirm that the condition is common in all football players; it reflects high occurrence in samples at a Boston brain bank that studies CTE. Many donors or their families contributed because of the players’ repeated concussions and troubling symptoms before they died…

The strongest scientific evidence says CTE can only be diagnosed by examining brains after death, although some researchers are experimenting with tests performed on the living. Many scientists believe repeated blows to the head increase risks for developing CTE, leading to progressive loss of normal brain matter and an abnormal buildup of a protein called tau. Combat veterans and athletes in rough contact sports like football and boxing are among those thought to be most at risk.

RTFA. There have been a couple times in my life when friends or family with sound experience in medicine suggested I turn down a work opportunity. Early on – folks made tempting offers to me if I would consider football as a serious path to education and lots of money further on. Even though my closest friend had initially gotten to college on a football scholarship he advised me against it. Just too many chances for a lifetime injury.

Glad I took his advice.

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