Father Drives 20,000 Miles From Nanjing, China to Seattle to Drop His Daughter Off at College

❝ After 108 days on the road, globetrotting father-daughter pair Huang Haitao and Huang Xinyi have finally arrived at their final destination: orientation.

Back in May, the duo set out on the ultimate adventure, road-tripping from their home in Nanjing in Eastern China to Xinyi’s college of choice, Seattle University…

❝ The decision to drive (flying over the Atlantic) the 18,642 miles from their home to her college came after Haitao promised to personally take his daughter to school if she were accepted into an American university. According to the Yangtze Evening News, the pair traveled through 26 countries, making stops in Russia, Turkey, Bulgaria, Greece, Albania, Switzerland, Austria, and many other new destinations. Once they reached the U.K., they boarded a plane to the U.S., shipping their car by boat overseas, and eventually picking up the road trip again on American soil. They drove along the historic Route 66 to Los Angeles before heading north to Seattle…

❝ For Xinyi’s father, the road trip was an important experience to share with his daughter before sending her off into adulthood.

“After she goes to college, there won’t really be many opportunities in future for me to spend so much time with her,” Mashable translated from the Yangtze Evening News. “She’ll have her own life, so the least I can do is send her onto the next chapter of her life.”

My kind of dad.

Court’s Ruling on Science and Climate Change Could Affect Other Fossil Fuel Projects

❝ Fossil fuel projects nationwide could be on notice after an appeals court ordered the federal government to rethink the climate change impacts of two giant coal mines, environmental lawyers and energy consultants tell Bloomberg BNA.

The decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit only directly affects Arch Coal and Peabody Energy, which operate the Wyoming mines in question, and only applies to five Western states…

❝ But the Sept. 14 decision establishes an argument that could be tested nationwide in other courts to challenge any fossil fuel-related project that might have climate change effects, said Jayni Foley Hein, policy director at New York University School of Law’s Institute for Policy Integrity. These might include natural gas pipelines, oil sand pipelines, coal railroads, and coal export terminals…

❝ Michelle Benedict Nowlin, an environmental law professor at Duke University, said the decision highlights language in the National Environmental Policy Act requiring that agencies follow the best available science. That language provides a bulwark against any given administration’s rejection of scientific consensus, Nowlin said.

Anyone have any idea which corrupt politicians, in or out of office, she might be thinking of? Someone who would reject scientific understanding, the common good, for the ideology of short-term profit above all else?