Simulation of 2017 Hurricanes and Aerosol Tracking

How can you see the atmosphere? By tracking what is carried on the wind. Tiny aerosol particles such as smoke, dust, and sea salt are transported across the globe, making visible weather patterns and other normally invisible physical processes.

❝ This visualization uses data from NASA satellites, combined with mathematical models in a computer simulation allow scientists to study the physical processes in our atmosphere. By following the sea salt that is evaporated from the ocean, you can see the storms of the 2017 hurricane season.

5 thoughts on “Simulation of 2017 Hurricanes and Aerosol Tracking

  1. Tom Corbett says:

    The first in a series of four advanced polar-orbiting satellites launched to space on its third try early Saturday (Nov. 18), turning its watchful eye to improving the accuracy of weather forecasts and Earth observations. The new Joint Polar Satellite System-1 satellite, or JPSS-1, launched into orbit atop a United Launch Alliance-built Delta II rocket at 4:47 a.m. EST (0947 GMT), lighting up the predawn sky over its Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The successful liftoff came after two scrubbed launch attempts earlier this week due to high winds and boats inside the launch range restriction zone offshore. https://www.space.com/38766-jpss1-weather-satellite-launch-success.html JPSS-1 will be renamed NOAA-20 once it’s declared operational in orbit, will use its instruments to measure atmospheric temperature, moisture, ozone levels, vegetation and rainfall across the globe – which it will circle every 90 minutes. Details and video @ https://www.space.com/38759-next-gen-weather-satellite-jpss-1-earth-science.html

  2. Waterworld says:

    Scientists have uncovered the ocean conditions that support a massive summertime bloom of algae that spans 16 percent of the global ocean. Known as the Great Calcite Belt, this dense group of a microscopic phytoplankton, coccolithophores, can be seen in satellite images as turquoise swirls in the dark blue water of the Southern Ocean. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-11/blfo-sod113017.php Image: https://media.eurekalert.org/multimedia_prod/pub/web/157320_web.jpg
    See also “The influence of environmental variability on the biogeography of coccolithophores and diatoms in the Great Calcite Belt” https://www.biogeosciences.net/14/4905/2017/

  3. Butterfly effect says:

    “Dust from Sahara Desert Moves West, Puts Brakes on Atlantic Hurricanes” (Insurance Journal August 6, 2018) https://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2018/08/06/497144.htm
    “Dust from the Sahara Desert in Africa — totaling a staggering 2 to 9 trillion pounds worldwide — has been almost a biblical plague on Texas and much of the Southern United States in recent weeks. The good news: the same dust appears to be a severe storm killer.” (Texas A&M July 20, 2018) https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/07/180720154909.htm
    “Saharan Dust Cloud Travels Across Atlantic” NOAA Visualization (7/30/18) https://youtu.be/F3Q8Sh2AjPo

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.