Another $21 Billion Worth of Pentagon Welfare Orphans?


How much healthcare would this have paid for?

The new F-35 Program Executive Officer, Vice Admiral Mat Winter, said his office is exploring the option of leaving 108 aircraft in their current state because the funds to upgrade them to the fully combat-capable configuration would threaten the Air Force’s plans to ramp up production in the coming years. These are most likely the same 108 aircraft the Air Force reportedly needed to upgrade earlier in 2017. Without being retrofitted, these aircraft would become “Concurrency Orphans,” airplanes left behind in the acquisition cycle after the services purchased them in haste before finishing the development process.

Left unsaid so far is what will become of the 81 F-35s purchased by the Marine Corps and Navy during that same period. If they are left in their current state, nearly 200 F-35s might permanently remain unready for combat because the Pentagon would rather buy new aircraft than upgrade the ones the American people have already paid for. What makes this particularly galling is the aircraft that would be left behind by such a scheme were the most expensive F-35s purchased so far. When the tab for all the aircraft purchased in an immature state is added up, the total comes to nearly $40 billion. That is a lot of money to spend on training jets and aircraft that will simply be stripped for spare parts.

Sum up all the money wasted by the Pentagon preparing for global thermonuclear war – throw in the minimum cost of our military stationed in 150-170 countries [varying according to who we’ve pissed off this month] – and you have the biggest cumulative waste of GDP in the history of the world.

2 thoughts on “Another $21 Billion Worth of Pentagon Welfare Orphans?

  1. Hanger Queen says:

    “With the F-35, Industry Is Holding Taxpayers Hostage : Support contracts invite abuse” http://warisboring.com/48277-2/ “Defense contractors are creating complicated support systems for the increasingly complex weapon systems the Pentagon buys, which allows the contractors to secure long-term contracts for which they have no competition from other companies.
    The F-35 serves as the ultimate example of this arrangement. Under the current plans, the American people will spend $406.5 billion for research, development, and procurement for a fleet of 2,456 F-35s.
    That’s a staggering figure, but it pales in comparison to the costs to sustain the program. These costs are expected to top $1.2 trillion through 2060, the expected lifespan of the program. That’s around $30 billion per year. While the sustainment-to-acquisition cost ratio for the F-35 program is roughly equivalent to the historic average of 70:30, the way in which the Pentagon and the contractors reach the 70-percent figure adds more than simple financial costs to the program.”

  2. Freedom isn't free™ says:

    “Up to $11.9B for B-52H Maintenance & Modernization” (12/5/17) https://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/up-to-119b-for-b-52h-maintenenace-modernization-06583/
    “B-52 bomb-bay upgrade declared ready for combat” http://www.janes.com/article/75906/b-52-bomb-bay-upgrade-declared-ready-for-combat As noted by the USAF, the enhancement, which forms part of the wider 1760 Internal Weapons Bay Upgrade (IWBU) for the B-52H, affords combat commanders a much more flexible weapons selection without the need to request additional air support.

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