“Cut the damned strings!”

❝ …According to a graphic, created by retired UC Berkeley professor of cognitive science and linguistics George Lakoff, which outlines four ways that the president uses his tweets to control the news cycle. First up? What Lakoff calls “preemptive framing”: getting your version of the story out first. Next is good old-fashioned diversion–changing the topic by, for instance, calling Meryl Streep overrated. Then there’s deflection, best described by Trump’s continued derision of the New York Times and CNN as “fake news,” particularly when either news organization reports anything negative about him. And the last way is the “trial balloon,” which Trump deployed spectacularly this week.

❝ Lakoff writes on Twitter, “Each tweet gets his message retweeted so he dominates social media. Reporters, social media influencers, and many others fall for it hook, line, and sinker. Every time…They may think they’re negating or undermining him, but that’s not how human brains work. As a cognitive scientist, I can tell you: Repeating his messages only helps him.”…

And maybe don’t retweet him. “Think of Trump as a puppeteer, his tweets as the strings, and anyone who retweets/shares him as the puppet,” he writes. “Cut the damn strings!”

Would you retweet Chuckie?

One thought on ““Cut the damned strings!”

  1. Tweety Pie says:

    Are Donald Trump’s tweets presidential records? https://www.pri.org/stories/2018-02-19/donald-trumps-tweets-are-now-presidential-records Congress created the Presidential Records Act of 1978 out of concern that former President Nixon would destroy the tapes that led to his resignation. The PRA sets strict rules for presidential records created during a president’s term. They include material related to “constitutional, statutory, or other official or ceremonial duties of the President.” This includes records created on electronic platforms like email, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. There is a narrow exception that things like diaries, journals or other personal notes don’t need to be opened for review. Under the law, the federal government must maintain ownership and control of all presidential records, including records created by the president’s staff. Once a president leaves office, all presidential records must be transferred to the archivist of the United States, who makes them available to the public over time.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.