What’s happening to Jupiter’s Great Red Spot?

❝ Jupiter’s Great Red Spot is perhaps the most iconic feature of any planet in our Solar System. It’s instantly recognizable, and the massive cyclone has been swirling for so long that we’ve taken for granted that it’ll always be there. Recent observations have shown that, unfortunately, that’s not the case. The storm is dying — the latest data from the Juno spacecraft suggests it might actually be gone within our lifetimes — and a new research paper by scientists at NASA suggests that it’s actually changing in both shape and color as it enters its twilight years…

The Great Red Spot is still great. It can still swallow the entire Earth whole, which is a pretty impressive feat for any weather feature, but it’s definitely less impressive than it once was. As NASA notes, a century and a half ago it was so wide that you could fit four Earths inside of its footprint, so it’s clearly losing a lot of steam…

RTFA. Construct your own fiction; but, take the time to learn fact, as well.

2 thoughts on “What’s happening to Jupiter’s Great Red Spot?

  1. Arthur C. says:

    Data from NASA’s Juno spacecraft suggests that Jupiter was shaken to its core by a colossal, head-on collision 4.5 billion years ago with a planet about 10 times more massive than Earth.
    According to a new study this week in the journal Nature, the planetary impact scenario can explain surprising readings about Jupiter’s gravitational field that Juno has made since arriving at the solar system’s largest planet in 2016. https://phys.org/news/2019-08-young-jupiter-smacked-head-on-massive.html

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