Massachusetts Wind Farm Will Save Customers $1.4 Billion


First and only offshore wind farm in the GOUSA

Massachusetts electricity users will save about $1.4 billion over 20 years from the first commercial-scale offshore wind farm in the U.S.

Avangrid Inc. and Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners, joint developers of the 800-megawatt project south of Martha’s Vineyard, expect to provide power and renewable energy credits for 6.5 cents a kilowatt-hour according to a letter Wednesday from the state Department of Energy Resources.

❝ That’s a levelized price in 2017 dollars over the term of the contracts, and makes the Vineyard Wind project about 18 percent cheaper than other alternatives, according to the letter. It’s also lower than the wind industry expected and shows that offshore wind can be a competitive source of clean energy as costs continue to come down.

Between Congress and the Two Old Parties, the United States probably would be late to our own funeral. We not only fail to get anything done on time. We blather around playing spin the bottle with all the failing old corporations afraid to build for the future. Our future.

One thought on “Massachusetts Wind Farm Will Save Customers $1.4 Billion

  1. Low Blow says:

    “American Electric Power last week abandoned its plan to build the largest wind farm in the United States, a victim of a complex mix of political, regulatory and market challenges.” (July 30, 2018) https://insideclimatenews.org/news/30072018/aep-cancels-wind-catcher-largest-wind-farm-oklahoma-oil-gas-opposition-clean-power-plan “The giant utility company gave up after the Texas Public Utility Commission rejected the 2,000 megawatt, $4.5 billion project known as Wind Catcher.
    The project faced stiff opposition from interest groups whose formidable regional influence is bolstered with fossil fuel money. And it faced a shifting financial landscape, with cheap natural gas and shifting tax policies casting doubts on its economic merits. It also needed 350 miles of controversial new transmission lines, often a daunting obstacle to large-scale grid modernization.”

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