Never forget


Click to enlarge

“Mrs. Fanny Parrott, wife of former slave near Siloam, Greene County, Georgia.” — By Jack Delano, Farm Security Administration Photography program (FSA). May 1941.

Click through to the large version of this photo. The quiet dignity, self-contained beauty of age and experience tolerating this camera-carrying record keeper.

11 thoughts on “Never forget

  1. Footnote says:

    Joice Heth (c. 1756 – February 19, 1836) was an African-American slave who was purchased and then exhibited by P.T. Barnum with the false claim that she was the 161-year-old nursing mammy of George Washington. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joice_Heth Joice Heth died in New York City on February 19, 1836, aged around 79. To gratify public interest, Barnum set up a public autopsy and engaged the service of a surgeon, Dr. David L. Rogers, who performed the autopsy on February 25, 1836, in front of fifteen hundred spectators in New York’s City Saloon, with Barnum charging fifty cents admission. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joice_Heth

  2. Low IQ says:

    “President Trump is known for throwing around insults, but his clashes with high-profile African-Americans this summer renewed focus on the language Trump uses to speak to and about black people.” https://www.npr.org/2018/09/10/645594393/low-iq-spectacular-dog-how-trump-tweets-about-african-americans “NPR examined Trump’s Twitter feed between June 1 and Labor Day. It provided a snapshot of a president who directs venomous tirades at black public figures who bash him, while singling out black celebrities who support him for praise.”

  3. Satayana says:

    The lynching of Thomas Shipp and Abram Smith, 1930 https://rarehistoricalphotos.com/lynching-thomas-shipp-abram-smith-1930/ “The picture was the inspiration for the poem “Strange Fruit” which was later put to song and popularized by the incredible Billy Holiday and became an early anthem for the burgeoning civil rights movement. Teacher/poet Abel Meeropol ran across this photo of the Shipp-Smith lynching a few years later in a magazine, and it so “haunted” him — his word — that he penned the anti-lynching poem “Strange Fruit”.

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