Yukon glaciers thinning fast — maybe forever!


Glaciologist Gwenn Flowers on Kaskawulsh glacierSusan Ormiston/CBC

❝ “We as Canadians are stewards of about a third of the world’s mountain glaciers and ice caps, so this is our responsibility,” Gwenn Flowers says.

The dramatic changes to the glaciers in the Yukon are an early warning of what climate change could mean for the rest of the planet, researchers say. And Flowers sees lots of reason for concern reflected in the state of the ice…

❝ Her tiny team of three is mapping the Kaskawulsh glacier — 70 kilometres long and five kilometres wide — as it struggles under the double threat of a warming climate and diminishing snow cover.

The research boils down to an inescapable conclusion: The glacier can’t compensate for the volume it’s losing now each year.

The shame is that those who have caused – and continue to cause – climate change take little or no responsibility for the results of their greed. Neither they nor the political hacks prancing through government halls are willing to confront or respond to what we learn from science and history.

An island matriarchy – in Europe


Fabian Weiss

❝ A four-hour ferry ride off the coast of Estonia, the sunlit conifers and coastal meadows of Kihnu Island rise gently from the Baltic Sea. You can bike from one end to the other in half an hour. Its four villages house around 700 people—only two thirds of whom live there year-round—and there is no hotel. Yet the island receives 12 times more tourists per resident than some of the most visited places in the world.

These tens of thousands of visitors don’t come for landmarks or amusement parks. Instead, they’re here to experience the unique culture of a place often touted as Europe’s last matriarchal society.

❝ “Kihnu women have a very important role: to keep the cultural traditions,” says Mare Mätas, president of the Kihnu Cultural Space Foundation and a driving force in many community projects. “They are taking care of the human life [cycle].”

Historically, Kihnu’s men left the island for weeks or months at a time, to hunt seals and fish and, later, to crew ships on international voyages. In their absence, women became the ones who tended farms, governed, and maintained traditions—traditions which have survived both time and turmoil.

Worth a visit.

Epic photo of Palestinian protestor


A’ed Abu AmroMustafa Hassona/Anadolu

❝ Captured on October 22 by Mustafa Hassouna of Turkey’s Anadolu Agency, the photo shows 20-year-old Palestinian A’ed Abu Amro seeming to rise out of the thick of a protest against the Israeli blockade.

He appears in sharp contrast to fellow demonstrators and reporters in protective jackets behind him, all set against a background of black smoke from burning tyres…

❝ “The flag I was carrying is the same one I always hold in all the other protests I’ve attended. My friends make fun of me, saying it is easier to throw rocks without holding a flag in the other hand, but I got used to it.

If I get killed, I want to be wrapped in the same flag. We are demanding our right of return, and protesting for our dignity and the dignity of our future generation.”

It’s been 70 years since the first major takeover of Palestinian homes and farms by the Israeli Army. The protest will not end until peace – and justice – return. Since the Great March of Return demonstrations began on March 30, Israeli forces have killed at least 205 Palestinians in the besieged coastal enclave, including journalists and paramedics, and have injured more than 18,000.

Cesar Sayoc’s van – annotated

❝ News crews arrived at the auto parts store in Florida where authorities arrested mail-bomb suspect Cesar Sayoc, 56, before FBI agents could secure and remove a white van that purportedly belongs to Sayoc. Television cameras obtained images of the van, revealing windows covered with apparent images of President Trump and slogans and rhetoric common among Trump supporters. Mixed in were graphics apparently created by Sayoc himself. Authorities soon covered the van with a heavy blue tarp…

❝ The images spread quickly on social media, with several people indicating that they’d seen — and photographed — the van in the area of Florida where Sayoc lived. Natalie Kline photographed the van in May 2017 and provided photos to The Washington Post.

What follows is a detailed analysis of images posted in the windows of Sayoc’s van. The van most assuredly is a rolling billboard for all the crap ideology espoused by our Fake President.