He gets job after copper gives him a ride to interview – instead of a ticket


Photo courtesy of Ka’Shawn Baldwin

❝ An Illinois man starts a new job Tuesday and he has a police officer to thank for getting him to his interview.

Ka’Shawn Baldwin, of East St. Louis, was pulled over Wednesday in Cahokia by officer Roger Gemoules for allegedly having expired license plates. Baldwin also did not have a valid driver’s license…

❝ “The routine thing is to tow the car and take the person to jail who is driving the car,” Baldwin said.

He told the officer that he did not have any other way to get to his interview at an area FedEx facility and that’s why he was driving illegally.

❝ Gemoules explained to Baldwin that the car could not be driven any further.

With no other option, Baldwin then asked the officer if he would give him a ride to his interview. To his surprise, Baldwin said Gemoules followed him home where he parked the car and took him to his interview.

❝ Gemoules said he could tell Baldwin really wanted the job.

“He was polite when I pulled him over and he seemed like a good young man, so I wanted to give him a chance,” Gemoules told NBC affiliate KSDK in St. Louis. “I knew if I gave him a bunch of tickets and towed his car, it would be tough to recover from.”

RTFA for more of the details. And, yes, as often as we have to blog about some creepy racist cop there are folks with a badge who are ahead of that curveball. Gotta get the right one is all. 🙂

Finland’s Hobbyhorse Girls


Dmitry Kostyukov for The New York Times

❝ For years, a subculture of teenage hobbyhorse enthusiasts flourished under the radar. Now the craze is a national export, and a celebration of girlhood

❝ It is impossible to say exactly when the Finnish hobbyhorse craze began, because it spread for years under the radar before adults became aware of it.

In 2012, a filmmaker, Selma Vilhunen, stumbled across internet discussion boards used by hobbyhorse enthusiasts and was enraptured…

❝ Teenage girls had invented a form of hobbyhorse dressage, in which the rider’s lower body pranced and galloped like a horse, while her upper body remained erect and motionless like a rider. This evolved into an elaborate network of coaches and students and competitions, but it was discussed only online, for the most part.

“It was like a secret society,” Ms. Vilhunen said…

My sister would have loved this when she was a girl. And, eventually, her daughters. No doubt.