Sanctuary is an old human right – still confronting evil policies today

❝ A stressful two-year chapter of Kadhim Albumohammed’s life is coming to a close.

Since July 2017, Albumohammed lived, along with his wife and daughter, in the basement of the First Congregational United Church of Christ in Albuquerque. On Wednesday afternoon, he addressed a crowd of about two hundred supporters after he learned that he can finally leave and go home without the fear of being detained by federal agents…

❝ Two years ago he showed up for an appointment with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, fully expecting to be detained. But, because of demonstrations by supporters, ICE cancelled Albumohammed’s appointment. But at his next scheduled appointment, Albumohammed’s lawyer showed up with a letter stating that her client decided to seek sanctuary instead. Albumohammed immigrated to the U.S. from Iraq out of fear of retaliation after supporting the U.S. during the first Gulf War. Then, in the mid-1990s, he was convicted and served his sentence for two misdemeanor domestic violence charges related to his then-girlfriend. For years, the U.S. did not deport Iraqi immigrants. But after President Donald Trump’s controversial travel ban from a list of majority Muslim countries, Iraq agreed to take deported Iraqis in exchange for not being included in the travel ban. That meant Albumohammed and many others who had been placed on removal status were at risk of being sent back to countries where they are less-than-welcome. Albumohammed, for example, not only assisted U.S. soldiers in Iraq, but also received a security clearance to work as a linguist for the U.S. government. That, Albumohammed and his attorney said, would likely mark him as a traitor to some in the country.

❝ Now, his lawyer Rebecca Kitson said, his case is being reopened and he gets to go home.

We have a criminal administration that doesn’t even honor treaties previous governments. Who would expect swine like Trump to respect someone foreign-born who ONLY risked their lives to aid our military.

3 thoughts on “Sanctuary is an old human right – still confronting evil policies today

  1. The bells says:

    “FILM; Laughton as Quasimodo: Epic Agony” By Simon Callow (The New York Times, 1988) https://www.nytimes.com/1988/05/15/movies/film-laughton-as-quasimodo-epic-agony.html (see also “Charles Laughton: A Difficult Actor” by Simon Callow (1997) https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-8021-1047-3

    “…The awareness of events in Europe so far, far away, hung heavily over the making of the film; and the day war was declared, [the director William] Dieterle wrote, ”The tension on the soundstage was unbearable. The scene in which Quasimodo rings the bell for Esmerelda, high in the bell tower. . . was supposed to be a kind of love scene between these two, but it developed into something so powerful that everybody including myself forgot that we were shooting a film.
    Something super-dimensional happened at that moment, so that I forgot to call ‘cut’ according to custom as the scene ended. Laughton went on ringing the bells after the scene was really over. Finally, completely exhausted, he stopped. Nobody was able to speak, nobody moved. It was an unforgettable thing. Finally, in his dressing-room, Charles could only say: ‘I couldn’t think of Esmerelda in that scene at all. I could only think of the poor people out there, going in to fight that bloody, bloody war! To arouse the world, to stop that terrible butchery! Awake! Awake! That’s what I felt when I was ringing the bells’ ”
    This is what acting can be. In ”The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” every scene that Laughton plays is informed by this sense of relation to the whole of mankind’s life. Of the scene on the wheel, Dieterle wrote: ”When Laughton acted that scene, enduring the terrible torture, he was not the poor crippled creature expecting compassion from the mob, but rather oppressed and enslaved mankind, suffering the most awful injustice.’’

  2. Zero-tolerance says:

    “The United States recognizes the right of asylum for individuals as specified by international and federal law. A specified number of legally defined refugees who either apply for asylum from inside the U.S. or apply for refugee status from outside the U.S., are admitted annually.
    Asylum has two basic requirements. First, an asylum applicant must establish that he or she fears persecution in their home country. Second, the applicant must prove that he or she would be persecuted on account of one of five protected grounds: race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or particular social group.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asylum_in_the_United_States
    “The United States is obliged to recognize valid claims for asylum under the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol. As defined by these agreements, a refugee is a person who is outside their country of nationality (or place of habitual residence if stateless) who, owing to a fear of persecution on account of a protected ground, is unable or unwilling to avail himself of the protection of the state. Protected grounds include race, nationality, religion, political opinion and membership of a particular social group. The signatories to these agreements are further obliged not to return or “refoul” refugees to the place where they would face persecution.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asylum_in_the_United_States#Relevant_law_and_procedures

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