The Climate Has Already Changed

❝ The Washington Post…published a massive, interactive feature on the effects of climate change in the United States, headlining the story by promising to illustrate the corners of the country that are warming fastest as the effects of a century’s worth of carbon emissions take hold.

❝ Climate change doesn’t warm the globe equally, according to the article, and some parts of the Lower 48 have already crossed the critical threshold of a 2 degrees Celsius temperature increase.

❝ “Today, more than 1 in 10 Americans — 34 million people — are living in rapidly heating regions, including New York City and Los Angeles. Seventy-one counties have already hit the 2-degree Celsius mark,” according to the article. Alaska is the fastest-warming state in the country. Rhode Island has already crossed the 2 degrees Celsius mark. New Jersey, Connecticut, Maine, and Massachusetts are close. The article includes an searchable graphic that produces the increase in temperature for U.S. counties.

If you’re still catching a free peek at the POST, more power to you. Retirees managing their resources tight enough to maybe live as long as they’d like to…are more pennywise than that. Here’s a link to the Washington POST article. As more folk quote it – it will become available in widespread fashion. Sounds like a good one.

One thought on “The Climate Has Already Changed

  1. Cassandra says:

    The World Resources Institute Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas researchers used hydrological models and more than 50 years of data to estimate the typical water supply of 189 countries compared to their demand. The result was a scale of “water stress” — how close a country comes to draining its annual water stores in a typical year.
    Note: risk of water stress scale left to right: lower [white] to higher [bright orange] – crosshatched indicates arid areas.
    “Because much of the territory is naturally arid, southwestern states are in the most precarious positions when it comes to water. New Mexico, for instance, was the only state in the “extremely high” category, earning the same alarming score (4.26 on a five-point scale) as the United Arab Emirates, which was the 10th most-stressed in the world. New Mexico’s demand sucks up more than 80 percent of the largely arid state’s annual supply. That leaves 20 percent, but such a narrow margin means that it may have trouble withstanding an extended drought or an increase in demand from population or industry growth.”

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