A doomsday gap…?

❝ The Air Force’s secretive space plane returns after more than two years : The space plane spent 779 days, 17 hours in space…

❝ As ever, the biggest question surrounding the Air Force’s space plane concerned what it was up to during its long flight in low-Earth orbit. “The spaceplane conducted on-orbit experiments,” an Air Force news release stated, blandly. “The distinctive ability to test new systems in space and return them to Earth is unique to the X-37B program and enables the US to more efficiently and effectively develop space capabilities necessary to maintain superiority in the space domain.”

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Sam Gilbey

Twitter now a quiet island on the global map of crap paid political advertising

❝ Twitter will no longer run political ads, CEO Jack Dorsey announced Wednesday, a move that comes as fellow social media giant Facebook faces rising heat over its policy of allowing candidates to lie in their campaign messaging.

❝ Twitter is removing itself from that contentious tangle as U.S. political campaigns prepare to spend vast sums of money on online advertising around the 2020 elections. The new policy applies worldwide, not just in the U.S., and to issue ads as well as ads run by specific political campaigns.

Hallelujah!

Fake president finally visits ballgame — crowd chants, “Lock him up! Lock him up!”

❝ He started the day with cheers and ended it with jeers. Hours after announcing the death of one of the world’s most notorious terrorists, President Trump found little love at the World Series.

❝ In his first appearance at a Major League Baseball game since taking office, Mr. Trump was not invited to throw the first pitch when he showed up Sunday night at Game 5 between the Washington Nationals and the Houston Astros. Instead, when he was shown on the stadium’s large screen, the crowd booed robustly and began chanting, “Lock him up!” In the upper decks, fans held up a giant “Impeach Trump!” banner.

Sometimes, you get what you deserve.

When guns retire from military service they still have a lot of death remaining


Smithsonian item No. 222,349Keith Brown

❝ Guns outlive their designers, makers, and first users. When they retire from military service, they still have a lot of death in them.

I held the evidence of this in my hands in April, in the Gun Room of the military collection at the National Museum of American History. Thanks to helpful and knowledgeable curators, I was able to operate the loading and firing mechanism of item No. 222,349: a breech-loading Peabody-Martini rifle produced almost 150 years ago. It was in perfect working order.

❝ I thought back to that rifle when I heard in September that U.S. arms manufacturer Colt has suspended production of its AR-15 semi-automatic rifle. Some view Colt’s decision as a victory for gun-control activists, but it barely diminishes civilian consumer choice or access. There are already 16 million AR-15s in the United States and their modular design, and widely available and interchangeable parts, make them virtually immortal. Though the AR-15 owes its existence to Colt, it has done what military technology has done throughout history: It has escaped the control of its producers.

RTFA. Nice piece of history. Nice example of the postwar life of military firearms. In the instances of repatriated machine guns, they are usually “dewatted” – rendered incapable of rapid repeating fire. Enabling that function, again, after civilian sale, used to be called re-watting. BITD.