Do you realize we’ve never stopped bombing Afghanistan?

Since 2016, we’ve increased airstrikes as much as 780% though combat operations in Afghanistan officially ended in December 2014…


US Air Force

US and coalition combat operations in Afghanistan officially ended in December 2014, and the numbers of CFACC-controlled airstrikes dropped from 2,365 for that year to just 947 in 2015 (the lowest figure recorded since 2009). The strike rate began to rapidly rise again in 2016 with 1,337 recorded, and rose again in 2017 with 4,361. It rose markedly again in 2018 with 7,362, before peaking at 7,423 in 2019.

Gee, what might have happened in 2016 to spark increased bombing of one of those little nations on our kill-list? Hmm?

BTW, there aren’t any more “coalition” forces operating over Afghanistan. It’s all our military, folks.

3 thoughts on “Do you realize we’ve never stopped bombing Afghanistan?

  1. Oscar Mike says:

    The United States has carried out an air raid against Taliban fighters in Afghanistan, a US forces spokesman said a day after President Donald Trump spoke to a senior Taliban leader by phone.
    “The US conducted an air strike on March 4 against Taliban fighters in Nahr-e Saraj, Helmand, who were actively attacking an ANDSF [Afghan National Defence and Security Forces] checkpoint,” said Colonel Sonny Leggett in a tweet on Wednesday, adding that it was a “defensive strike”.
    The raid, the first against the Taliban in 11 days, comes [3] days after the US and Taliban signed a deal aimed at ending the nearly 19-year-old war in Afghanistan – the US’s longest.
    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/03/conducts-air-strike-taliban-peace-deal-200304085937305.html
    President Trump on Tuesday said he held a “very good talk” with a Taliban leader in what may be the first direct discussion between a US leader and a senior Taliban official.
    Taliban’s chief negotiator, Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, and Trump held a 35-minute telephone call, a Taliban spokesman said, with Trump later confirming the call to reporters at the White House.
    In an emailed statement later, Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said Trump told Baradar that US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo would soon speak to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani “so that the barriers against the inter-Afghan talks get removed”.
    Under the deal signed Saturday, the U.S. military must decrease troop levels to 8,600 in 135 days. The deal also lays out a timeline for a full U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan in 14 months if the Taliban lives up to its commitments.
    In exchange, the Taliban is assuring it will not allow Afghanistan to be used by terrorists to attack the United States. https://thehill.com/policy/defense/485266-us-taliban-sign-deal-to-withdraw-troops-from-afghanistan
    According to former national security adviser Susan Rice this amounts to “effectively subcontracting America’s security to the Taliban.” https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/04/opinion/afghan-bargain-fail.html

  2. Beat goes on says:

    “Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced Monday a decision to slash $1 billion in U.S. aid to Afghanistan, saying that Washington is “disappointed” in the country’s rival leaders, who have been unable to form a government following last year’s disputed presidential elections.” https://www.npr.org/2020/03/24/820550175/u-s-disappointed-in-afghan-leadership-will-slash-1-billion-in-aid-pompeo-says
    “He didn’t say when the aid would be cut, but said that if Washington wasn’t satisfied with progress in Afghanistan, another $1 billion would be cut in 2021.
    However, in a subsequent briefing with reporters on his plane during a return flight to the U.S., Pompeo declined to be specific about what part of U.S. aid would be cut and suggested that the announcement was largely meant as a threat.
    Following his brief stop in Kabul during which he was sharply critical of Afghan officials, Pompeo stopped in Doha, where he met with Taliban negotiators. Pompeo was later asked if the Taliban were also “acting inconsistently with the agreement.”
    “No,” he said. “They committed to reducing violence; they have largely done that, and then they are working towards delivering their team to the ultimate negotiations.”

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