Coronavirus is starting to hit rural America hard

The coronavirus is rapidly surging throughout the United States, with some small rural counties leading the country in per capita rates of confirmed cases, according to a CNBC data analysis.

Rural counties like Gunnison County, Colorado; Blaine County, Idaho; and Summit County, Utah have all been struggling with a recent surge in infections. The counties, located in states popular for skiing and hiking, are now grappling with tourists spreading infections and overwhelming local hospitals…

The sparsely populated areas are ill equipped to deal with the rapid spreads, and mayors and county officials are pointing to a major lack of testing and medical supplies for patients.

RTFA. Rural America is consistently underserved by national concerns, DC politicians. I’m not certain if people dying will get anymore attention from folks in Congress in Big City suits will expand their focus.

4 thoughts on “Coronavirus is starting to hit rural America hard

  1. Daniel 5:5 says:

    The coronavirus pandemic has sent U.S. farmers into a panic after it further drove down crop and livestock prices and raised concerns about labor shortages on farms.
    Farm trade groups are lobbying the Trump administration to give financial aid for farmers enduring price drops, as well as timely visas for seasonal workers from Mexico who will pick crops on U.S. farms this year. https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/28/coronavirus-hits-already-struggling-us-farmers-with-drop-in-prices.html

    “In a typical year, more than 200,000 foreigners will get temporary permits, known as H-2A visas, to work in agriculture from Florida to Washington and everywhere in between. But after fears of the coronavirus pandemic soared in recent weeks, the United States government decided on Monday to close consulates like the one in Monterrey—leaving American farmers scrambling and Mexican workers stranded at one of the busiest times of the season.” (March 20, 2020) https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2020/03/mexico-farms-h2a-visas-produce-coronavirus-us/

  2. p/s says:

    “Dumped milk, smashed eggs and plowed vegetables: Coronavirus pandemic leaves staggering amount of food waste” https://www.chicagotribune.com/coronavirus/ct-nw-nyt-coronavirus-food-waste-20200413-x5n6sbmrh5an3cilo6hxozrkj4-story.html
    “In Wisconsin and Ohio, farmers are dumping thousands of gallons of fresh milk into lagoons and manure pits. An Idaho farmer has dug huge ditches to bury 1 million pounds of onions. And in South Florida, a region that supplies much of the Eastern half of the United States with produce, tractors are crisscrossing bean and cabbage fields, plowing perfectly ripe vegetables back into the soil.
    After weeks of concern about shortages in grocery stores and mad scrambles to find the last box of pasta or toilet paper roll, many of the nation’s largest farms are struggling with another ghastly effect of the pandemic. They are being forced to destroy tens of millions of pounds of fresh food that they can no longer sell.
    The closing of restaurants, hotels and schools has left some farmers with no buyers for more than half their crops. And even as retailers see spikes in food sales to Americans who are now eating nearly every meal at home, the increases are not enough to absorb all of the perishable food that was planted weeks ago and intended for schools and businesses.
    …The widespread destruction of fresh food — at a time when many Americans are hurting financially and millions are suddenly out of work — is an especially dystopian turn of events, even by the standards of a global pandemic. It reflects the profound economic uncertainty wrought by the virus and how difficult it has been for huge sectors of the economy, like agriculture, to adjust to such a sudden change in how they must operate.”

    The Great Depression diet: 4 ways our eating habits have changed since the 1930s https://www.marketwatch.com/story/this-is-what-people-ate-during-the-great-depression-spicy-was-out-and-bland-was-in-2016-09-22

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