Trump will rally in Tulsa on Juneteenth…Of course!


Click to enlarge — Everett/Shutterstock

The remains of Greenwood, the African American section of Tulsa, Oklahoma, June 1921, after a white mob slaughtered residents

President Donald Trump was hit with strong backlash Thursday over his decision to hold a campaign rally next week on Juneteenth, a holiday marking the end of slavery, in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the site of one of the deadliest race riots in American history, in 1921.

Rep. Karen Bass…chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus, said…”This was a massacre of innocent Black inhabitants by White supremacists in a span of 24 hours”…”This was the worst act of racial violence to date,” she added, “and yet this is the place that the president, who has pursued nothing but a hostile and oppressive agenda for black people since his inauguration, has chosen to celebrate.”

It gets harder, day-by-day, to find anything other than curse words to characterize this Fake President. Elected by fools and collective ignorance – with a dollop of men afraid of women added for good measure, Trump and the GOP used an outdated electoral system to win control of our government after losing the popular vote.

Yes, there’s no shortage of collusion between the two old parties maintaining an election system older than dirt. Still, at least the Democrats had the courage – finally – to walk away from voters stuck into the official racism mandated by Confederate traitors to the American Constitution. Today’s Republican Party wallows in that stink.

Apple Still Won’t Help the FBI Break Into iPhones. Good.

That’s the title of an Opinion Piece published in Bloomberg News.

There are two important lessons in this week’s announcement that the Federal Bureau of Investigation has finally succeeded in cracking two mobile phones belonging to Mohammed Alshamrani, the aviation student who killed three people last December at a naval base in Pensacola, Florida.

The first lesson is that cracking an encrypted device takes time and effort even when the federal government brings all its resources to bear. The second is that Apple still refuses to build tools to make hacking its mobile devices easier.

Maybe I’m in the minority, but I’m happy about both.

RTFA. Stephen Carter makes a decent – albeit flawed – case for the first lesson. I’ll stick with his support for the second on principle.

The flaw? He thinks the cost of resources required to hack into anyone’s phone is prohibitive and, therefore, self-limiting. We have government agencies that gleefully waste billion$ on anachronistic military devices, pet projects for totally anal politicians, self-congratulatory research on regulations premised upon moving this nation in just about any direction but forward. Don’t count on wasting money as a problem.