Tokyo Gas building Japan’s first big offshore wind farm…as a start

Tokyo Gas Co. plans to develop one of Japan’s largest offshore wind projects as the nation looks to a major expansion of the technology to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050.

The 600-megawatt facility — about 30 times larger than the nation’s existing capacity — is planned to be built off the coast of Chiba prefecture, east of Tokyo, if it gains approval from the government, a company spokesman said on Wednesday. Tokyo Gas joined a consortium with Shizen Energy Inc. and Canada’s Northland Power Inc. in order to develop the project…

Offshore wind developments are key to Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga’s pledge for Japan to become emissions neutral by the middle of the century, and the government has thrown its support behind developing a number of offshore blocks. Tokyo Gas is one of just a handful of Japanese utilities that have committed to a net-zero emissions target…

Capacity in offshore wind in Japan may reach 10 gigawatts by 2030 and 30 gigawatts by 2040, according to the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. The nation currently has just 20 megawatts of capacity.

Once you get rolling, aside from whatever is your nation’s style in useless bureaucrats, wind power is sensible and easy to grow. I’m not talking about political sleaze or budget weenies. Just the technology.

One thought on “Tokyo Gas building Japan’s first big offshore wind farm…as a start

  1. Yee-haw! says:

    “As of January 2020, the total installed wind power nameplate generating capacity in the United States was 105,583 megawatts (MW). … Texas, with 28,843 MW of capacity, about 16.8% of the state’s electricity usage, had the most installed wind power capacity of any U.S. state at the end of 2019. Texas also had more under construction than any other state currently has installed.”
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_power_in_the_United_States
    Also: “The installed wind capacity in Texas exceeds installed wind capacity in all countries but China, the United States, Germany and India.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_power_in_Texas

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