Drones on Wall Street


Training the trainer

Drones have arrived on Wall Street, reports cnbc.com. Major investment banks are deploying the craft to offer important clients “a bird’s-eye view” of companies they’re interested in merging with or acquiring (M&A)…

Goldman Sachs, one of the world’s top M&A advisors, is one such company employing drones. Stephan Feldgoise, the firm’s global co-head of mergers and acquisitions, said, “We have been selling asset-based businesses all over the world using drones for site visits and fly-overs. It gives buyers the confidence they need because when you are purchasing a business, you want to see, touch and feel what you’re buying. ” He added, “Drones are likely here to stay. We believe it will change the M&A landscape forever.”

The personal on-site walk-through is over. COVID-19 put an end to that. Looks like a positive change. More than 95% of the several hundred deals Goldman closed since the start of the pandemic utilized drones for an on-site tour.

Fences affect environments around the world…rarely studied or regulated


Marian Deschain

What is the most common form of human infrastructure in the world? It may well be the fence. Recent estimates suggest that the total length of all fencing around the globe is 10 times greater than the total length of roads…

On every continent, from cities to rural areas and from ancient to modern times, humans have built fences. But we know almost nothing about their ecological effects. Border fences are often in the news, but other fences are so ubiquitous that they disappear into the landscape, becoming scenery rather than subject.

[In fact]…compiling studies from ecosystems around the world…research shows that fences produce a complex range of ecological effects.

I love articles that jog my brain into looking at my own life’s landscape to examine/re-examine the subject matter. Living where barbed wire rules, here in the American Southwest, you have to think about fences anywhere you roam.