Congress Clown Show actually snuck some good into that clunky Omnibus Bill

The legislation passed by the US Senate Monday was downright frankensteinian: a pile of unrelated bills stitched together. Apart from the pandemic relief measures, it contained thousands of pages of government funding and tax credit extensions, like a semester’s worth of homework stapled to the final exam.

But in the end, it includes the most significant federal energy and climate policy in years, setting the agenda for Department of Energy research programs and authorizing higher funding levels for clean energy priorities…

The legislation also includes the Energy Act of 2020, which lays out a lengthy to-do list for the Department of Energy and others. There is far too much in the act to detail it all, but [the article features] some highlights.

There are lots of if’s in the coming year. It will take a Herculean effort to clear the knee-deep shit overlaying many useful agencies. Criminal corporate flunkies musr be flushed down the same toilet of history that awaits Trumpublicans and hisself. Then, the need to rebuild and, of course, better than before.

I’m not certain if the Biden crowd and the Dems as currently constituted are capable of much [or all] of that. Reforming the Democratic Party into a progressive political party never made me salivate in the past…and still doesn’t. But, we all try our best, eh?

Hawks and hope


Ellis Juhlin

I am a graduate student in ecology studying the parasites of ferruginous hawk nestlings. I have worked studying birds and promoting their conservation since I graduated college in 2017. I watch the diversity of birds that migrates through Cache Valley, Utah, keeping my outdoor lights off to diminish the light pollution they struggle to navigate through. Birds are a great unifier, the most accessible wildlife we have. No matter where you are, you can almost always spot a bird nearby. But now, as someone who works with wildlife in the West, I am scared for my hawks, and the rest of the wildlife that calls this place home.

What I am observing in the lives of these birds, and experiencing in my own life, surpasses the emotionless term “climate change.”…In an online discussion in November between Terry Tempest Williams and Pam Houston, two authors I admire, the term “climate change” was not used. We were discussing Williams’ book, Erosion, where the changing climate is a central theme. However, these two authors referred only to climate collapse. The moment Houston said “climate collapse,” the buzzer in my head went off, as if we were in a game show. I immediately knew what she meant. I am living through a climate collapse.

RTFA. Ellis Juhlin is a grad student at Utah State. An advocate for “the cultivation of responsible relationships between humans and our natural world”.

I’ll second that emotion!